Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Geopolitics of sensing and knowing: on (de)coloniality, border thinking and epistemic disobedience

Geopolitics of sensing and knowing: on (de)coloniality, border thinking and epistemic disobedience This essay offers an introduction to the ‘decolonial option’. The author begins by setting his project apart from its European contemporaries such as biopolitics and by tracing the historical origins of his project to the Bandung Conference of 1955 that asserted decolonization as the ‘third way’, beyond Soviet communism and liberal capitalism. Decoloniality needs to emphasize itself once again as a ‘third way’. This time it has to break the tandem formed by ‘rewesternization’ (championed by Obama's administration and the EU) and ‘dewesternization’ (represented by so-called emergent countries). The decolonial option embraces epistemic disobedience and border thinking in order to question the behaviour of world powers. Ultimately what is at stake is advancing what the author calls global political society. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Postcolonial Studies Taylor & Francis

Geopolitics of sensing and knowing: on (de)coloniality, border thinking and epistemic disobedience

Postcolonial Studies , Volume 14 (3): 11 – Sep 1, 2011
11 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/geopolitics-of-sensing-and-knowing-on-de-coloniality-border-thinking-vKy8cctwwO

References (23)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright The Institute of Postcolonial Studies
ISSN
1466-1888
eISSN
1368-8790
DOI
10.1080/13688790.2011.613105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay offers an introduction to the ‘decolonial option’. The author begins by setting his project apart from its European contemporaries such as biopolitics and by tracing the historical origins of his project to the Bandung Conference of 1955 that asserted decolonization as the ‘third way’, beyond Soviet communism and liberal capitalism. Decoloniality needs to emphasize itself once again as a ‘third way’. This time it has to break the tandem formed by ‘rewesternization’ (championed by Obama's administration and the EU) and ‘dewesternization’ (represented by so-called emergent countries). The decolonial option embraces epistemic disobedience and border thinking in order to question the behaviour of world powers. Ultimately what is at stake is advancing what the author calls global political society.

Journal

Postcolonial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2011

There are no references for this article.