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Gramsci and peasant subalternity in India

Gramsci and peasant subalternity in India Such key Gramscian concepts as hegemony and passive revolution, hitherto discussed mainly in relation to Western industrial societies, also have a direct relevance to the study of peasant societies. Critically applied, Gramsci's ideas give fresh emphasis to the central importance and dialectical nature of elite‐subaltern relations in rural India in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His stress upon the negative and derivative aspects of peasant culture and ideology needs, however, to be qualified by an awareness of the strengths and relative autonomy of subaltern politics within the overall structure of elite domination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Peasant Studies Taylor & Francis

Gramsci and peasant subalternity in India

The Journal of Peasant Studies , Volume 11 (4): 23 – Jul 1, 1984

Gramsci and peasant subalternity in India

The Journal of Peasant Studies , Volume 11 (4): 23 – Jul 1, 1984

Abstract

Such key Gramscian concepts as hegemony and passive revolution, hitherto discussed mainly in relation to Western industrial societies, also have a direct relevance to the study of peasant societies. Critically applied, Gramsci's ideas give fresh emphasis to the central importance and dialectical nature of elite‐subaltern relations in rural India in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His stress upon the negative and derivative aspects of peasant culture and ideology needs, however, to be qualified by an awareness of the strengths and relative autonomy of subaltern politics within the overall structure of elite domination.

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References (16)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1743-9361
eISSN
0306-6150
DOI
10.1080/03066158408438246
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Such key Gramscian concepts as hegemony and passive revolution, hitherto discussed mainly in relation to Western industrial societies, also have a direct relevance to the study of peasant societies. Critically applied, Gramsci's ideas give fresh emphasis to the central importance and dialectical nature of elite‐subaltern relations in rural India in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. His stress upon the negative and derivative aspects of peasant culture and ideology needs, however, to be qualified by an awareness of the strengths and relative autonomy of subaltern politics within the overall structure of elite domination.

Journal

The Journal of Peasant StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 1984

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