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GRAPHICACY AS A FORM OF COMMUNICATION

GRAPHICACY AS A FORM OF COMMUNICATION Children of today inhabit a multi-dimensional world and in order to communicate effectively in it they need the ability to utilise four forms of communication namely, oracy, literacy, numeracy and graphicacy. Communicating in graphic form requires an ability to both encode and decode spatial information using symbols which requires the utilisation and application of spatial perceptual skills and concepts. The draft Curriculum Framework for General and Further Education and Training identifies graphic literacy as one of the critical outcomes of the new South African curriculum. Spatial information about the environment is most frequently communicated in the graphic mode. Yet if graphicacy is to be recognised as an essential mode of communication and, as such, a vital element in education, then we need to seek ways of developing and introducing an explicit and critical pedagogy in our schools to foster the development of graphic and critical graphic literacy. But first, the skills and concepts integral to graphicacy need to be identified and understood. This article provides a framework for thinking about graphicacy as a form of communication in the General Education and Training (GET) band, the compulsory component of South African education (Grades 1–9). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png South African Geographical Journal Taylor & Francis

GRAPHICACY AS A FORM OF COMMUNICATION

South African Geographical Journal , Volume 81 (2): 5 – May 1, 1999
5 pages

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References (16)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
2151-2418
eISSN
0373-6245
DOI
10.1080/03736245.1999.9713668
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Children of today inhabit a multi-dimensional world and in order to communicate effectively in it they need the ability to utilise four forms of communication namely, oracy, literacy, numeracy and graphicacy. Communicating in graphic form requires an ability to both encode and decode spatial information using symbols which requires the utilisation and application of spatial perceptual skills and concepts. The draft Curriculum Framework for General and Further Education and Training identifies graphic literacy as one of the critical outcomes of the new South African curriculum. Spatial information about the environment is most frequently communicated in the graphic mode. Yet if graphicacy is to be recognised as an essential mode of communication and, as such, a vital element in education, then we need to seek ways of developing and introducing an explicit and critical pedagogy in our schools to foster the development of graphic and critical graphic literacy. But first, the skills and concepts integral to graphicacy need to be identified and understood. This article provides a framework for thinking about graphicacy as a form of communication in the General Education and Training (GET) band, the compulsory component of South African education (Grades 1–9).

Journal

South African Geographical JournalTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 1999

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