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Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect by Robert J. Sampson

Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect by Robert J. Sampson BOOK REVIEWS Robert J. Sampson, Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012). There is a scene in the film Crocodile Dundee in which a young hoodlum threatens the titular protagonist with a knife. In response to his girlfriend’s tremulous observation of this fact, Dundee, unfazed, brandishes a comically much larger knife and quips sardonically, “that’s not a knife . . . THIS is a knife.” The hood turns tail, Dundee returns the knife to its sheath, and the film chugs merrily on. I was reminded of this scene several times while reading Robert J. Sampson’s Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect (GAC). With respect to social scientists past, present, and future: THIS is a book. For starters, the empirical core of GAC relies on no fewer than six original (both words merit emphasis, in my view) data collection efforts—all with several to many thousands of cases and most with multiple waves—grouped under the umbrella moniker Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN). At least three additional secondary data sources were concatenated to the family of PHDCN studies to measure neighborhood demographics, crime, and the incidence of stranger http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Urban Affairs Taylor & Francis

Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect by Robert J. Sampson

Journal of Urban Affairs , Volume 35 (3): 3 – Aug 1, 2013

Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect by Robert J. Sampson

Journal of Urban Affairs , Volume 35 (3): 3 – Aug 1, 2013

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Robert J. Sampson, Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012). There is a scene in the film Crocodile Dundee in which a young hoodlum threatens the titular protagonist with a knife. In response to his girlfriend’s tremulous observation of this fact, Dundee, unfazed, brandishes a comically much larger knife and quips sardonically, “that’s not a knife . . . THIS is a knife.” The hood turns tail, Dundee returns the knife to its sheath, and the film chugs merrily on. I was reminded of this scene several times while reading Robert J. Sampson’s Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect (GAC). With respect to social scientists past, present, and future: THIS is a book. For starters, the empirical core of GAC relies on no fewer than six original (both words merit emphasis, in my view) data collection efforts—all with several to many thousands of cases and most with multiple waves—grouped under the umbrella moniker Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN). At least three additional secondary data sources were concatenated to the family of PHDCN studies to measure neighborhood demographics, crime, and the incidence of stranger

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Urban Affairs Association
ISSN
1467-9906
eISSN
0735-2166
DOI
10.1111/juaf.12023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Robert J. Sampson, Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012). There is a scene in the film Crocodile Dundee in which a young hoodlum threatens the titular protagonist with a knife. In response to his girlfriend’s tremulous observation of this fact, Dundee, unfazed, brandishes a comically much larger knife and quips sardonically, “that’s not a knife . . . THIS is a knife.” The hood turns tail, Dundee returns the knife to its sheath, and the film chugs merrily on. I was reminded of this scene several times while reading Robert J. Sampson’s Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect (GAC). With respect to social scientists past, present, and future: THIS is a book. For starters, the empirical core of GAC relies on no fewer than six original (both words merit emphasis, in my view) data collection efforts—all with several to many thousands of cases and most with multiple waves—grouped under the umbrella moniker Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN). At least three additional secondary data sources were concatenated to the family of PHDCN studies to measure neighborhood demographics, crime, and the incidence of stranger

Journal

Journal of Urban AffairsTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 1, 2013

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