Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Grief and bereavement in contemporary society: Bridging research and practice

Grief and bereavement in contemporary society: Bridging research and practice 322 Book Reviews Csikszentmihalyi’s interesting study engages the notions of ming (fate) and tian (power of the cosmos) in outlining two unconventional views of allotted life span emerging from the Analects. Additional chapters include: a discussion of war and death in ancient Chinese cos- mology by Roger Ames; a treatment of death in the Zhuangzi by Mark Berkson; a dis- cussion of death in the Huainanzi by Michael Pruett; and a treatment of death in the neo-Confucian tradition by Guoxiang Peng. While the inclusion of Chan Buddhism in the volume is valuable, the basis for Tao Jiang’s comparative treatment of Linji with William James – that their philosophical traditions ‘share a pragmatic inclination on many other issues’ (p. 250) – is thin, with their ‘vastly different attitudes’ overshadow- ing any apparent resemblances (p. 264). Although it is fair to criticize the volume for its disproportionate focus on topics predating the end of the Eastern Han era (Campany, 2012, pp. 783–784), the collection demonstrates the richness of Chinese responses to mortality, inviting scholars to extend the scope of related scholarship beyond what is contained within its pages. REFERENCES CAMPANY, R. F. (2012). Review of mortality in traditional Chinese thought. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mortality Taylor & Francis

Grief and bereavement in contemporary society: Bridging research and practice

Mortality , Volume 18 (3): 3 – Aug 1, 2013
3 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/grief-and-bereavement-in-contemporary-society-bridging-research-and-LX0Wq50e0l

References (7)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2013 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1469-9885
eISSN
1357-6275
DOI
10.1080/13576275.2013.819491
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

322 Book Reviews Csikszentmihalyi’s interesting study engages the notions of ming (fate) and tian (power of the cosmos) in outlining two unconventional views of allotted life span emerging from the Analects. Additional chapters include: a discussion of war and death in ancient Chinese cos- mology by Roger Ames; a treatment of death in the Zhuangzi by Mark Berkson; a dis- cussion of death in the Huainanzi by Michael Pruett; and a treatment of death in the neo-Confucian tradition by Guoxiang Peng. While the inclusion of Chan Buddhism in the volume is valuable, the basis for Tao Jiang’s comparative treatment of Linji with William James – that their philosophical traditions ‘share a pragmatic inclination on many other issues’ (p. 250) – is thin, with their ‘vastly different attitudes’ overshadow- ing any apparent resemblances (p. 264). Although it is fair to criticize the volume for its disproportionate focus on topics predating the end of the Eastern Han era (Campany, 2012, pp. 783–784), the collection demonstrates the richness of Chinese responses to mortality, inviting scholars to extend the scope of related scholarship beyond what is contained within its pages. REFERENCES CAMPANY, R. F. (2012). Review of mortality in traditional Chinese thought. The

Journal

MortalityTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.