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Growing Up as Risky Business? Risks, Surveillance and the Institutionalized Mistrust of Youth

Growing Up as Risky Business? Risks, Surveillance and the Institutionalized Mistrust of Youth This paper will argue that a major problem for young people today is that they increasingly cause adults anxiety. This anxiety translates into a raft of interventions and strategies and programmes that target young people. These imaginings reflect and constitute a range of anxieties about the dangers posed by some young people, or to some young people, and how these risks might be economically and prudently managed. These institutionalized relationships of mistrust can have a range of often negative consequences (intended or otherwise) for individuals and populations of young people. I argue that Foucault's work on disciplinary, sovereign and governmental forms of power provides a generative framework for analysing what I refer to as the institutionalized mistrust, surveillance and regulation of contemporary populations of young people. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Youth Studies Taylor & Francis

Growing Up as Risky Business? Risks, Surveillance and the Institutionalized Mistrust of Youth

Journal of Youth Studies , Volume 6 (2): 16 – Jun 1, 2003
16 pages

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References (51)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-9680
eISSN
1367-6261
DOI
10.1080/1367626032000110291
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper will argue that a major problem for young people today is that they increasingly cause adults anxiety. This anxiety translates into a raft of interventions and strategies and programmes that target young people. These imaginings reflect and constitute a range of anxieties about the dangers posed by some young people, or to some young people, and how these risks might be economically and prudently managed. These institutionalized relationships of mistrust can have a range of often negative consequences (intended or otherwise) for individuals and populations of young people. I argue that Foucault's work on disciplinary, sovereign and governmental forms of power provides a generative framework for analysing what I refer to as the institutionalized mistrust, surveillance and regulation of contemporary populations of young people.

Journal

Journal of Youth StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2003

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