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I Knew It All Along: The Sexual Grooming Behaviors of Child Molesters and the Hindsight Bias

I Knew It All Along: The Sexual Grooming Behaviors of Child Molesters and the Hindsight Bias Recent high profile cases of child sexual abuse have increased interest in the grooming behaviors of child molesters and why these offenders are not identified sooner. This study examined one possible explanation—the hindsight bias. Five hundred and twenty-six undergraduates were randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes and asked to rate the likelihood the person in the story is a child molester. Results supported the presence of the hindsight bias, with participants who were given outcome information overestimating the likelihood they would have predicted that the person was a child molester. Also, participants were able to recognize sexual grooming behaviors when the potential child molester was a relative and nonrelative. Findings indicated that sexual grooming behaviors may be more easily identified than previously proposed, but individuals greatly overestimate the likelihood they would have predicted a person was a child molester once they are given outcome information. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal Of Child Sexual Abuse Taylor & Francis

I Knew It All Along: The Sexual Grooming Behaviors of Child Molesters and the Hindsight Bias

17 pages

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References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1547-0679
eISSN
1053-8712
DOI
10.1080/10538712.2015.1108945
pmid
26789256
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent high profile cases of child sexual abuse have increased interest in the grooming behaviors of child molesters and why these offenders are not identified sooner. This study examined one possible explanation—the hindsight bias. Five hundred and twenty-six undergraduates were randomly assigned to read one of six vignettes and asked to rate the likelihood the person in the story is a child molester. Results supported the presence of the hindsight bias, with participants who were given outcome information overestimating the likelihood they would have predicted that the person was a child molester. Also, participants were able to recognize sexual grooming behaviors when the potential child molester was a relative and nonrelative. Findings indicated that sexual grooming behaviors may be more easily identified than previously proposed, but individuals greatly overestimate the likelihood they would have predicted a person was a child molester once they are given outcome information.

Journal

Journal Of Child Sexual AbuseTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2016

Keywords: Child molester; child sexual abuse; grooming behaviors; hindsight bias; outcome information; sex offender; sex offense; sexual grooming

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