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In the roiling smoke: qualitative inquiry and contested fields

In the roiling smoke: qualitative inquiry and contested fields Two British authors reflect on the current state of qualitative research, viewed as a battlefield through roiling smoke. From a UK perspective they reflect on the perceived crisis in qualitative research in the United States. They also suggest that there are four important features that good qualitative research should rely on: problematizing ‘education’; avoiding ethnocentricism; appreciating the long history of qualitative research; and carrying out proper in‐depth ethnographic studies that generate adequately theorized analysis. If these features appear, qualitative research will thrive. Researchers need to reaffirm the significance of qualitative research but repeated searches for novelty and a denial of past achievements will weaken our overall claim for legitimacy. In the UK and Europe qualitative research is flourishing, but there too it needs constantly to demonstrate the quality of research and its enduring impact on high‐quality social research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Qualititative Studies in Education Taylor & Francis

In the roiling smoke: qualitative inquiry and contested fields

9 pages

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References (29)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1366-5898
eISSN
0951-8398
DOI
10.1080/09518390600975974
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Two British authors reflect on the current state of qualitative research, viewed as a battlefield through roiling smoke. From a UK perspective they reflect on the perceived crisis in qualitative research in the United States. They also suggest that there are four important features that good qualitative research should rely on: problematizing ‘education’; avoiding ethnocentricism; appreciating the long history of qualitative research; and carrying out proper in‐depth ethnographic studies that generate adequately theorized analysis. If these features appear, qualitative research will thrive. Researchers need to reaffirm the significance of qualitative research but repeated searches for novelty and a denial of past achievements will weaken our overall claim for legitimacy. In the UK and Europe qualitative research is flourishing, but there too it needs constantly to demonstrate the quality of research and its enduring impact on high‐quality social research.

Journal

International Journal of Qualititative Studies in EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2006

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