Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Interculturalism vs. Multiculturalism: A Distinction without a Difference?

Interculturalism vs. Multiculturalism: A Distinction without a Difference? Journal of Intercultural Studies Vol. 33, No. 2, April 2012, pp. 217224 Interculturalism vs. Multiculturalism: A Distinction without a Difference? Geoffrey Brahm Levey The terms ‘interculturalism’ and ‘multiculturalism’ have occupied the same discursive space for a few decades now, especially in Continental Europe and in Quebec. Where they have engaged, it has typically been interculturalists seeking to nudge multi- culturalism out of the way or into a specific corner. Nasar Meer and Tariq Modood do both sides  and indeed, all of us  a service by scrutinising the alleged differences between the two approaches to the negotiation of cultural difference by and within liberal democracies. They find the standard suggestions for interculturalism’s distinctiveness and superiority over multiculturalism to be unconvincing. I agree with the general thrust of their argument. The two terms are so discursively fluid and the respective self-identifying camps seem so multifarious as to frustrate any clear or stable demarcation between the two. Moreover, this is true even after restricting the comparison, as Meer and Modood carefully do, to the strand of policy-related multiculturalism that preoccupies liberal political theory. For all that, I demur on some of the details of their case. I will conclude by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Intercultural Studies Taylor & Francis

Interculturalism vs. Multiculturalism: A Distinction without a Difference?

Journal of Intercultural Studies , Volume 33 (2): 8 – Apr 1, 2012
8 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/interculturalism-vs-multiculturalism-a-distinction-without-a-zmDNtG1len

References (23)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-9540
eISSN
0725-6868
DOI
10.1080/07256868.2012.649529
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Intercultural Studies Vol. 33, No. 2, April 2012, pp. 217224 Interculturalism vs. Multiculturalism: A Distinction without a Difference? Geoffrey Brahm Levey The terms ‘interculturalism’ and ‘multiculturalism’ have occupied the same discursive space for a few decades now, especially in Continental Europe and in Quebec. Where they have engaged, it has typically been interculturalists seeking to nudge multi- culturalism out of the way or into a specific corner. Nasar Meer and Tariq Modood do both sides  and indeed, all of us  a service by scrutinising the alleged differences between the two approaches to the negotiation of cultural difference by and within liberal democracies. They find the standard suggestions for interculturalism’s distinctiveness and superiority over multiculturalism to be unconvincing. I agree with the general thrust of their argument. The two terms are so discursively fluid and the respective self-identifying camps seem so multifarious as to frustrate any clear or stable demarcation between the two. Moreover, this is true even after restricting the comparison, as Meer and Modood carefully do, to the strand of policy-related multiculturalism that preoccupies liberal political theory. For all that, I demur on some of the details of their case. I will conclude by

Journal

Journal of Intercultural StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Apr 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.