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Junior Secondary Schools—an educational initiative in Ghana

Junior Secondary Schools—an educational initiative in Ghana Compare, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1989 Junior Secondary Schools—an educational initiative in Ghana HELEN SCADDING, Tamale, Ghana Every school was to have a purpose-built workshop, now they'll be given a tool-box each. (Deputy Director of Education, Northern Region, Ghana) Classrooms in urgent need of repair, leaking roofs, inadequate furniture, outdated textbooks, lack of ancillary help, declining school meals service, poor staff pay, low morale, threatened industrial action, teachers over-burdened with new initiatives, massive political restructuring of the education service, schools increasingly funded by the local community, a resurgence of interest in vocational 'relevant' education, inequalities widening... such was the scene of state education in Britain when I left in September 1987. Little did I expect to find that the above description fits exactly the educational situation here in Ghana. There are obvious major differences between the two countries, not least of which is the tremendous gulf between Ghana and Britain in life expectancy, health facilities, diet, housing, industry, transport and literacy levels, all of which affect the education service. A further difference is that Ghanaian education seems at least to be preparing for an upturn from a low base, whereas the British system seems to be being allowed to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education Taylor & Francis

Junior Secondary Schools—an educational initiative in Ghana

Junior Secondary Schools—an educational initiative in Ghana


Abstract

Compare, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1989 Junior Secondary Schools—an educational initiative in Ghana HELEN SCADDING, Tamale, Ghana Every school was to have a purpose-built workshop, now they'll be given a tool-box each. (Deputy Director of Education, Northern Region, Ghana) Classrooms in urgent need of repair, leaking roofs, inadequate furniture, outdated textbooks, lack of ancillary help, declining school meals service, poor staff pay, low morale, threatened industrial action, teachers over-burdened with new initiatives, massive political restructuring of the education service, schools increasingly funded by the local community, a resurgence of interest in vocational 'relevant' education, inequalities widening... such was the scene of state education in Britain when I left in September 1987. Little did I expect to find that the above description fits exactly the educational situation here in Ghana. There are obvious major differences between the two countries, not least of which is the tremendous gulf between Ghana and Britain in life expectancy, health facilities, diet, housing, industry, transport and literacy levels, all of which affect the education service. A further difference is that Ghanaian education seems at least to be preparing for an upturn from a low base, whereas the British system seems to be being allowed to

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-3623
eISSN
0305-7925
DOI
10.1080/0305792890190105
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Compare, Vol. 19, No. 1, 1989 Junior Secondary Schools—an educational initiative in Ghana HELEN SCADDING, Tamale, Ghana Every school was to have a purpose-built workshop, now they'll be given a tool-box each. (Deputy Director of Education, Northern Region, Ghana) Classrooms in urgent need of repair, leaking roofs, inadequate furniture, outdated textbooks, lack of ancillary help, declining school meals service, poor staff pay, low morale, threatened industrial action, teachers over-burdened with new initiatives, massive political restructuring of the education service, schools increasingly funded by the local community, a resurgence of interest in vocational 'relevant' education, inequalities widening... such was the scene of state education in Britain when I left in September 1987. Little did I expect to find that the above description fits exactly the educational situation here in Ghana. There are obvious major differences between the two countries, not least of which is the tremendous gulf between Ghana and Britain in life expectancy, health facilities, diet, housing, industry, transport and literacy levels, all of which affect the education service. A further difference is that Ghanaian education seems at least to be preparing for an upturn from a low base, whereas the British system seems to be being allowed to

Journal

Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1989

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