Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Knowledge Bases, Talents, and Contexts: On the Usefulness of the Creative Class Approach in Sweden

Knowledge Bases, Talents, and Contexts: On the Usefulness of the Creative Class Approach in Sweden AbstractThe geography of the creative class and its impact on regional development has been debated for some years. While the ideas of Richard Florida have permeated local and regional planning strategies in most parts of the Western world, critiques have been numerous. Florida’s 3T’s (technology, talent, and tolerance) have been adopted without considering whether the theory fits into the settings of a specific urban and regional context. This article aims to contextualize and unpack the creative class approach by applying the knowledge-base approach and break down the rigid assumption that all people in the creative class share common locational preferences. We argue that the creative class draws on three different knowledge bases: synthetic, analytical, and symbolic, which have different implications for people’s residential locational preferences with respect to a people climate and a business climate. Furthermore, the dominating knowledge base in a region has an influence on the importance of a people climate and a business climate for attracting and retaining talent. In this article, we present an empirical analysis in support of these arguments using original Swedish data. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Economic Geography Taylor & Francis

Knowledge Bases, Talents, and Contexts: On the Usefulness of the Creative Class Approach in Sweden

Economic Geography , Volume 85 (4): 18 – Oct 1, 2009

Knowledge Bases, Talents, and Contexts: On the Usefulness of the Creative Class Approach in Sweden

Economic Geography , Volume 85 (4): 18 – Oct 1, 2009

Abstract

AbstractThe geography of the creative class and its impact on regional development has been debated for some years. While the ideas of Richard Florida have permeated local and regional planning strategies in most parts of the Western world, critiques have been numerous. Florida’s 3T’s (technology, talent, and tolerance) have been adopted without considering whether the theory fits into the settings of a specific urban and regional context. This article aims to contextualize and unpack the creative class approach by applying the knowledge-base approach and break down the rigid assumption that all people in the creative class share common locational preferences. We argue that the creative class draws on three different knowledge bases: synthetic, analytical, and symbolic, which have different implications for people’s residential locational preferences with respect to a people climate and a business climate. Furthermore, the dominating knowledge base in a region has an influence on the importance of a people climate and a business climate for attracting and retaining talent. In this article, we present an empirical analysis in support of these arguments using original Swedish data.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/knowledge-bases-talents-and-contexts-on-the-usefulness-of-the-creative-5Lb1ObzDol

References (34)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2009 Clark University
ISSN
1944-8287
eISSN
0013-0095
DOI
10.1111/j.1944-8287.2009.01051.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThe geography of the creative class and its impact on regional development has been debated for some years. While the ideas of Richard Florida have permeated local and regional planning strategies in most parts of the Western world, critiques have been numerous. Florida’s 3T’s (technology, talent, and tolerance) have been adopted without considering whether the theory fits into the settings of a specific urban and regional context. This article aims to contextualize and unpack the creative class approach by applying the knowledge-base approach and break down the rigid assumption that all people in the creative class share common locational preferences. We argue that the creative class draws on three different knowledge bases: synthetic, analytical, and symbolic, which have different implications for people’s residential locational preferences with respect to a people climate and a business climate. Furthermore, the dominating knowledge base in a region has an influence on the importance of a people climate and a business climate for attracting and retaining talent. In this article, we present an empirical analysis in support of these arguments using original Swedish data.

Journal

Economic GeographyTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2009

Keywords: knowledge bases; creative class; business climate; people climate; context; Sweden

There are no references for this article.