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Land Tenure Systems and Their Impacts on Agricultural Investments and Productivity in Uganda

Land Tenure Systems and Their Impacts on Agricultural Investments and Productivity in Uganda This article provides an empirical analysis of the impact of different tenure systems (mailo, customary, and public land) on agricultural investment and productivity in central Uganda. A major hypothesis tested is that land investments and practices may have both economic and tenure security implications. The results indicate that coffee planting is used by farmers to enhance tenure security, while fallowing is practised to a greater extent by farmers on more secure holdings. This supports the notion that farmers consider tenure implications when making investments and that different tenure systems do not inhibit the promotion of tree-planting investment. Tenure had no impact on the productivity of crop farming. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Development Studies Taylor & Francis

Land Tenure Systems and Their Impacts on Agricultural Investments and Productivity in Uganda

Journal of Development Studies , Volume 38 (6): 24 – Aug 1, 2002
24 pages

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References (25)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1743-9140
eISSN
0022-0388
DOI
10.1080/00220380412331322601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article provides an empirical analysis of the impact of different tenure systems (mailo, customary, and public land) on agricultural investment and productivity in central Uganda. A major hypothesis tested is that land investments and practices may have both economic and tenure security implications. The results indicate that coffee planting is used by farmers to enhance tenure security, while fallowing is practised to a greater extent by farmers on more secure holdings. This supports the notion that farmers consider tenure implications when making investments and that different tenure systems do not inhibit the promotion of tree-planting investment. Tenure had no impact on the productivity of crop farming.

Journal

Journal of Development StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Aug 1, 2002

Keywords: Uganda; land tenure systems; tenure security; land investments and practices

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