Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

LESSONS FROM THE OPEN UNIVERSITY: THIRD‐AGE LEARNING

LESSONS FROM THE OPEN UNIVERSITY: THIRD‐AGE LEARNING Negative stereotypes about older people's capacity to engage in serious learning have, until recent times, been supported by psychological studies of age‐related cognitive functioning. Recent studies, however, reveal a wide variety of capability among those in the third age. Significant evidence of this is provided by the performance of 25 years of older students at the U.K. Open University. The proportion of undergraduate students over age 50 has risen to 14%, and the proportion over 60 has risen to 5%. Whilst their course choices, motivations, and methods of learning differ from younger students’, their academic performance compares favorably. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Gerontology Taylor & Francis

LESSONS FROM THE OPEN UNIVERSITY: THIRD‐AGE LEARNING

Educational Gerontology , Volume 21 (5): 13 – Jan 1, 1995

LESSONS FROM THE OPEN UNIVERSITY: THIRD‐AGE LEARNING

Educational Gerontology , Volume 21 (5): 13 – Jan 1, 1995

Abstract

Negative stereotypes about older people's capacity to engage in serious learning have, until recent times, been supported by psychological studies of age‐related cognitive functioning. Recent studies, however, reveal a wide variety of capability among those in the third age. Significant evidence of this is provided by the performance of 25 years of older students at the U.K. Open University. The proportion of undergraduate students over age 50 has risen to 14%, and the proportion over 60 has risen to 5%. Whilst their course choices, motivations, and methods of learning differ from younger students’, their academic performance compares favorably.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/lessons-from-the-open-university-third-age-learning-m0ohszB3mm

References (8)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1521-0472
eISSN
0360-1277
DOI
10.1080/0360127950210504
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Negative stereotypes about older people's capacity to engage in serious learning have, until recent times, been supported by psychological studies of age‐related cognitive functioning. Recent studies, however, reveal a wide variety of capability among those in the third age. Significant evidence of this is provided by the performance of 25 years of older students at the U.K. Open University. The proportion of undergraduate students over age 50 has risen to 14%, and the proportion over 60 has risen to 5%. Whilst their course choices, motivations, and methods of learning differ from younger students’, their academic performance compares favorably.

Journal

Educational GerontologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.