Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Making and Marketing Woollen Cloth in Late-Medieval London

Making and Marketing Woollen Cloth in Late-Medieval London AbstractThis paper discusses the interaction in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries of the five cloth-making trades — burellers, weavers, fullers, shearmen, and dyers — with the drapers who sold the cloth. The drapers initially sold imported cloth, and the burellers made and sold cheap Candlewick cloth. With the replacement of imported by local cloth, weavers, fullers and shearmen made cloth, much of it of high quality, which they sold to drapers. Drapers also purchased provincial cloth. In the fifteenth century, drapers turned almost exclusively to provincial cloth, some of which they exported themselves and some of which they sold to other merchants, particularly aliens. Much provincial cloth was dyed and finished in London prior to sale, so that many shearmen, dyers and fullers prospered, while the weavers declined; those continuing to weave mostly moved to the suburbs. Drapers expanded their overseas trade, selling finished cloth to southern Europe, and cloth to Antwerp, becoming the second largest company of cloth exporters after the Mercers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The London Journal: A Review of Metropolitan Society Past and Present Taylor & Francis

Making and Marketing Woollen Cloth in Late-Medieval London

Making and Marketing Woollen Cloth in Late-Medieval London


Abstract

AbstractThis paper discusses the interaction in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries of the five cloth-making trades — burellers, weavers, fullers, shearmen, and dyers — with the drapers who sold the cloth. The drapers initially sold imported cloth, and the burellers made and sold cheap Candlewick cloth. With the replacement of imported by local cloth, weavers, fullers and shearmen made cloth, much of it of high quality, which they sold to drapers. Drapers also purchased provincial cloth. In the fifteenth century, drapers turned almost exclusively to provincial cloth, some of which they exported themselves and some of which they sold to other merchants, particularly aliens. Much provincial cloth was dyed and finished in London prior to sale, so that many shearmen, dyers and fullers prospered, while the weavers declined; those continuing to weave mostly moved to the suburbs. Drapers expanded their overseas trade, selling finished cloth to southern Europe, and cloth to Antwerp, becoming the second largest company of cloth exporters after the Mercers.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/making-and-marketing-woollen-cloth-in-late-medieval-london-1v9kvKgC0z

References (53)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2011 Maney Publishing
ISSN
1749-6322
eISSN
0305-8034
DOI
10.1179/174963211X13034705699144
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis paper discusses the interaction in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries of the five cloth-making trades — burellers, weavers, fullers, shearmen, and dyers — with the drapers who sold the cloth. The drapers initially sold imported cloth, and the burellers made and sold cheap Candlewick cloth. With the replacement of imported by local cloth, weavers, fullers and shearmen made cloth, much of it of high quality, which they sold to drapers. Drapers also purchased provincial cloth. In the fifteenth century, drapers turned almost exclusively to provincial cloth, some of which they exported themselves and some of which they sold to other merchants, particularly aliens. Much provincial cloth was dyed and finished in London prior to sale, so that many shearmen, dyers and fullers prospered, while the weavers declined; those continuing to weave mostly moved to the suburbs. Drapers expanded their overseas trade, selling finished cloth to southern Europe, and cloth to Antwerp, becoming the second largest company of cloth exporters after the Mercers.

Journal

The London Journal: A Review of Metropolitan Society Past and PresentTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2011

Keywords: ARTISANS; CLOTH; GUILDS; MANUFACTURING; MERCHANTS; TRADE

There are no references for this article.