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Mass Shooters in the USA, 1966–2010: Differences Between Attackers Who Live and Die

Mass Shooters in the USA, 1966–2010: Differences Between Attackers Who Live and Die Previous research suggests that there are fundamental psychological and behavioral differences between offenders who commit murder and offenders who commit murder-suicide. Whether a similar distinction exists for rampage, workplace, and school shooters remains unknown. Using data from the 2010 NYPD report, this study presents results from the first regression analysis of all qualifying mass shooters who struck in the USA between 1966 and 2010 (N = 185). Findings suggest that there are fundamental differences between mass shooters who die as a result of their attacks and mass shooters who live. Patterns among offenders, the weapons they use, the victims they kill, and the locations they attack may have significant implications for scholars and security officials alike. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Justice Quarterly Taylor & Francis

Mass Shooters in the USA, 1966–2010: Differences Between Attackers Who Live and Die

Justice Quarterly , Volume 32 (2): 20 – Mar 4, 2015
20 pages

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References (59)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2013 Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences
ISSN
1745-9109
eISSN
0741-8825
DOI
10.1080/07418825.2013.806675
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous research suggests that there are fundamental psychological and behavioral differences between offenders who commit murder and offenders who commit murder-suicide. Whether a similar distinction exists for rampage, workplace, and school shooters remains unknown. Using data from the 2010 NYPD report, this study presents results from the first regression analysis of all qualifying mass shooters who struck in the USA between 1966 and 2010 (N = 185). Findings suggest that there are fundamental differences between mass shooters who die as a result of their attacks and mass shooters who live. Patterns among offenders, the weapons they use, the victims they kill, and the locations they attack may have significant implications for scholars and security officials alike.

Journal

Justice QuarterlyTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 4, 2015

Keywords: mass shooters; active shooters; rampage shooters; school shooters; workplace violence; murder-suicide

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