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Measuring Meaning: Searching for and Making Sense of Spousal Loss in Late-Life

Measuring Meaning: Searching for and Making Sense of Spousal Loss in Late-Life Despite much recent theorizing, evidence regarding the temporal relationship of sense-making to adjustment following bereavement remains relatively sparse. This study examined the role of searching for and making sense of loss in late-life spousal bereavement, using prospective, longitudinal data from the Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC) project (N = 250). Searching at 6 and 18 months post-loss predicted both contemporaneous and subsequent grief. Sense-making was not related to grief for this sample. In contrast, sense-making at 6 months and 18 months predicted positive affect at 48 months, although searching had no prospective effect on this outcome. Searching at 6 months predicted depression at 18 months. Results are interpreted in terms of meaning-oriented theories of bereavement and processes promoting both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Death Studies Taylor & Francis

Measuring Meaning: Searching for and Making Sense of Spousal Loss in Late-Life

Death Studies , Volume 34 (9): 31 – Sep 20, 2010
31 pages

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References (61)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1091-7683
eISSN
0748-1187
DOI
10.1080/07481181003761625
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite much recent theorizing, evidence regarding the temporal relationship of sense-making to adjustment following bereavement remains relatively sparse. This study examined the role of searching for and making sense of loss in late-life spousal bereavement, using prospective, longitudinal data from the Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC) project (N = 250). Searching at 6 and 18 months post-loss predicted both contemporaneous and subsequent grief. Sense-making was not related to grief for this sample. In contrast, sense-making at 6 months and 18 months predicted positive affect at 48 months, although searching had no prospective effect on this outcome. Searching at 6 months predicted depression at 18 months. Results are interpreted in terms of meaning-oriented theories of bereavement and processes promoting both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes.

Journal

Death StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 20, 2010

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