Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Media framing of trolling and online abuse: silencing strategies, symbolic violence, and victim blaming

Media framing of trolling and online abuse: silencing strategies, symbolic violence, and victim... AbstractThis article draws on British newspaper reports in order to demonstrate that trolling, and the media’s subsequent framing of trolling, involves “silencing strategies.” It is important to examine how trolling is discussed within the media to understand how it might frame public opinion, debate, and action, and implicitly victim blame. The article presents findings on the forms of (online) abuse and behaviours related to trolling in media reports, including rape threats, death threats, and body shaming. It also explores the media portrayal of victims of trolling, and the advice given concerning how to respond to trolls. To comply with the message to women, which is propagated in media and popular discourses: “do not feed the troll” means that “symbolic violence” is exercised with the complicity of the victim(s) of trolling, which has broader implications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Feminist Media Studies Taylor & Francis

Media framing of trolling and online abuse: silencing strategies, symbolic violence, and victim blaming

Feminist Media Studies , Volume 17 (6): 15 – Nov 2, 2017

Media framing of trolling and online abuse: silencing strategies, symbolic violence, and victim blaming

Feminist Media Studies , Volume 17 (6): 15 – Nov 2, 2017

Abstract

AbstractThis article draws on British newspaper reports in order to demonstrate that trolling, and the media’s subsequent framing of trolling, involves “silencing strategies.” It is important to examine how trolling is discussed within the media to understand how it might frame public opinion, debate, and action, and implicitly victim blame. The article presents findings on the forms of (online) abuse and behaviours related to trolling in media reports, including rape threats, death threats, and body shaming. It also explores the media portrayal of victims of trolling, and the advice given concerning how to respond to trolls. To comply with the message to women, which is propagated in media and popular discourses: “do not feed the troll” means that “symbolic violence” is exercised with the complicity of the victim(s) of trolling, which has broader implications.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/media-framing-of-trolling-and-online-abuse-silencing-strategies-MoNR0nf1R7

References (69)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1471-5902
eISSN
1468-0777
DOI
10.1080/14680777.2017.1316755
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractThis article draws on British newspaper reports in order to demonstrate that trolling, and the media’s subsequent framing of trolling, involves “silencing strategies.” It is important to examine how trolling is discussed within the media to understand how it might frame public opinion, debate, and action, and implicitly victim blame. The article presents findings on the forms of (online) abuse and behaviours related to trolling in media reports, including rape threats, death threats, and body shaming. It also explores the media portrayal of victims of trolling, and the advice given concerning how to respond to trolls. To comply with the message to women, which is propagated in media and popular discourses: “do not feed the troll” means that “symbolic violence” is exercised with the complicity of the victim(s) of trolling, which has broader implications.

Journal

Feminist Media StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 2, 2017

Keywords: Framing; online abuse; rape; social media; trolling; victims

There are no references for this article.