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Men's Participation in Family Planning Decisions in Kenya

Men's Participation in Family Planning Decisions in Kenya Population Studies, 51 (1997), 29-40 Printed in Great Britain Men's Participation in Family Planning Decisions in Kenya OMONDI-ODHIAMBO mental in the decision to regulate fertility. Caldwell INTRODUCTION and Caldwell (1990) have reminded us that nearly Although men and women have practised con- all studies of African societies refer to the extreme traception for many years, men have effectively difficulty and rarity of discussion of sexual topics been excluded either deliberately or by default between spouses. For example, data from the from participating in many family planning pro- Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) grammes (Carlos and Dialo 1986, p. 8). Their views of 1989 show that 34 per cent of currently married on sexuality, reproductive health, family size, birth women who knew of at least one method of con- spacing and similar topics have rarely been sought traception, and 36 per cent of husbands included in fertility or family planning surveys. For example, in the survey, had not discussed family planning in only seven per cent of the 42 World Fertility with their spouses during the year preceding the Surveys conducted were husbands interviewed survey (National Council for Population and (Verma 1985, p. 35). Similarly, in none of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Studies Taylor & Francis

Men's Participation in Family Planning Decisions in Kenya

Population Studies , Volume 51 (1): 12 – Mar 1, 1997
12 pages

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References (1)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1477-4747
eISSN
0032-4728
DOI
10.1080/0032472031000149706
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Population Studies, 51 (1997), 29-40 Printed in Great Britain Men's Participation in Family Planning Decisions in Kenya OMONDI-ODHIAMBO mental in the decision to regulate fertility. Caldwell INTRODUCTION and Caldwell (1990) have reminded us that nearly Although men and women have practised con- all studies of African societies refer to the extreme traception for many years, men have effectively difficulty and rarity of discussion of sexual topics been excluded either deliberately or by default between spouses. For example, data from the from participating in many family planning pro- Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (KDHS) grammes (Carlos and Dialo 1986, p. 8). Their views of 1989 show that 34 per cent of currently married on sexuality, reproductive health, family size, birth women who knew of at least one method of con- spacing and similar topics have rarely been sought traception, and 36 per cent of husbands included in fertility or family planning surveys. For example, in the survey, had not discussed family planning in only seven per cent of the 42 World Fertility with their spouses during the year preceding the Surveys conducted were husbands interviewed survey (National Council for Population and (Verma 1985, p. 35). Similarly, in none of the

Journal

Population StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1997

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