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Metaphors in Collision: Objectives, Assembly Lines, and Stories

Metaphors in Collision: Objectives, Assembly Lines, and Stories Prominent in teacher preparation programs and in “methods” courses in departments and faculties of education are planning procedures derived from the “Tyler rationale.” A key part of these procedures involves beginning the planning process by stating objectives. These procedures, and particularly planning- by-objectives, have been much criticized. A difficulty with the criticisms has been their ineffectiveness at engaging the metaphorical basis of such planning procedures, identified with industrial processes such as the assembly line. A second difficulty has been that the critics offer no alternative planning procedures. This article reviews and restates objections to the dominant objectives-based procedures and offers an alternative procedure based on the story form. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Curriculum Inquiry Taylor & Francis

Metaphors in Collision: Objectives, Assembly Lines, and Stories

Curriculum Inquiry , Volume 18 (1): 24 – Mar 1, 1988

Metaphors in Collision: Objectives, Assembly Lines, and Stories

Curriculum Inquiry , Volume 18 (1): 24 – Mar 1, 1988

Abstract

Prominent in teacher preparation programs and in “methods” courses in departments and faculties of education are planning procedures derived from the “Tyler rationale.” A key part of these procedures involves beginning the planning process by stating objectives. These procedures, and particularly planning- by-objectives, have been much criticized. A difficulty with the criticisms has been their ineffectiveness at engaging the metaphorical basis of such planning procedures, identified with industrial processes such as the assembly line. A second difficulty has been that the critics offer no alternative planning procedures. This article reviews and restates objections to the dominant objectives-based procedures and offers an alternative procedure based on the story form.

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1988 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1467-873X
eISSN
0362-6784
DOI
10.1080/03626784.1988.11076026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Prominent in teacher preparation programs and in “methods” courses in departments and faculties of education are planning procedures derived from the “Tyler rationale.” A key part of these procedures involves beginning the planning process by stating objectives. These procedures, and particularly planning- by-objectives, have been much criticized. A difficulty with the criticisms has been their ineffectiveness at engaging the metaphorical basis of such planning procedures, identified with industrial processes such as the assembly line. A second difficulty has been that the critics offer no alternative planning procedures. This article reviews and restates objections to the dominant objectives-based procedures and offers an alternative procedure based on the story form.

Journal

Curriculum InquiryTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1988

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