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More than the kill: hunters' relationships with landscape and prey

More than the kill: hunters' relationships with landscape and prey Through a discussion of the perceptions of hunters within a New Zealand tourism context, this article explores how different perspectives of the ‘connection’ between hunter and prey are performed by participants and analysed by scholars using distinct ethical approaches. It attempts to contribute to the conversation about hunting ethics within the tourism and recreation fields by discussing the limitations of environmental ethical positions involved in analysing hunters' narratives and performances while engaging with their prey. An analysis of the sublime environment in which the hunting performance takes place proves to be central to the discussion of this sensual engagement with the hunted animal. It is argued that the contradictory feelings that sometimes prevail within hunters when it comes to the relationship between loving and killing must be considered in this kind of research and that some hunting practices are undoubtedly a way to feel close to, and engaged with, the target animals that are offered respect. Hunting expressions as dynamic cultural performances serve to generate fruitful discussions, contributing to an understanding of broader tourist relationships with nonhuman animals and the ethical issues involved in hunting practices. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Issues in Tourism Taylor & Francis

More than the kill: hunters' relationships with landscape and prey

Current Issues in Tourism , Volume 12 (5-6): 15 – Nov 1, 2009
15 pages

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References (52)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1747-7603
eISSN
1368-3500
DOI
10.1080/13683500903042881
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Through a discussion of the perceptions of hunters within a New Zealand tourism context, this article explores how different perspectives of the ‘connection’ between hunter and prey are performed by participants and analysed by scholars using distinct ethical approaches. It attempts to contribute to the conversation about hunting ethics within the tourism and recreation fields by discussing the limitations of environmental ethical positions involved in analysing hunters' narratives and performances while engaging with their prey. An analysis of the sublime environment in which the hunting performance takes place proves to be central to the discussion of this sensual engagement with the hunted animal. It is argued that the contradictory feelings that sometimes prevail within hunters when it comes to the relationship between loving and killing must be considered in this kind of research and that some hunting practices are undoubtedly a way to feel close to, and engaged with, the target animals that are offered respect. Hunting expressions as dynamic cultural performances serve to generate fruitful discussions, contributing to an understanding of broader tourist relationships with nonhuman animals and the ethical issues involved in hunting practices.

Journal

Current Issues in TourismTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2009

Keywords: hunting; environment; ethics; sublime landscape; tourism; New Zealand

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