Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Performativity, Commodification and Commitment: An I-Spy Guide to the Neoliberal University

Performativity, Commodification and Commitment: An I-Spy Guide to the Neoliberal University British Journal of Educational Studies Vol. 60, No. 1, March 2012, pp. 17–28 PERFORMATIVITY, COMMODIFICATION AND COMMITMENT: AN I-SPY GUIDE TO THE NEOLIBERAL UNIVERSITY by STEPHEN J. BALL, Institute of Education, University of London 1. INTRODUCTION Reflection is a dangerous thing; it is all too easy to slip from careful re-assessment and analysis into nostalgia and ‘golden ageism’, although in a period of austerity that slippage might be very understandable. Let us get to the nub of things. I was a student in two ‘plate glass’, welfare state universities, Essex (founded 1964) and Sussex (founded 1961), although they were very different. Essex was very small, socially very diverse and politi- cally ‘exciting’, to say the least – a sort of comprehensive university. My sociology teachers there profoundly influenced me intellectually and they taught me to think. Sussex, ‘Balliol by the Sea’ as it was dubbed, had a very different social pro- file and institutional habitus but was pedagogically very adventurous. When I started teaching at Sussex in the School of Education we recruited 24 full-time, fully funded Masters students every year, many of them from the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) and we worked closely with the various innovative http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Educational Studies Taylor & Francis

Performativity, Commodification and Commitment: An I-Spy Guide to the Neoliberal University

British Journal of Educational Studies , Volume 60 (1): 12 – Mar 1, 2012
12 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/performativity-commodification-and-commitment-an-i-spy-guide-to-the-2CA0SrDOiY

References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 2012 Society for Educational Studies
ISSN
1467-8527
eISSN
0007-1005
DOI
10.1080/00071005.2011.650940
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

British Journal of Educational Studies Vol. 60, No. 1, March 2012, pp. 17–28 PERFORMATIVITY, COMMODIFICATION AND COMMITMENT: AN I-SPY GUIDE TO THE NEOLIBERAL UNIVERSITY by STEPHEN J. BALL, Institute of Education, University of London 1. INTRODUCTION Reflection is a dangerous thing; it is all too easy to slip from careful re-assessment and analysis into nostalgia and ‘golden ageism’, although in a period of austerity that slippage might be very understandable. Let us get to the nub of things. I was a student in two ‘plate glass’, welfare state universities, Essex (founded 1964) and Sussex (founded 1961), although they were very different. Essex was very small, socially very diverse and politi- cally ‘exciting’, to say the least – a sort of comprehensive university. My sociology teachers there profoundly influenced me intellectually and they taught me to think. Sussex, ‘Balliol by the Sea’ as it was dubbed, had a very different social pro- file and institutional habitus but was pedagogically very adventurous. When I started teaching at Sussex in the School of Education we recruited 24 full-time, fully funded Masters students every year, many of them from the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA) and we worked closely with the various innovative

Journal

British Journal of Educational StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2012

There are no references for this article.