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Planning reunification: the planning history of the fall of the Berlin Wall

Planning reunification: the planning history of the fall of the Berlin Wall This article looks at the history of plans for the reuse of the zone of land left vacant by the fall of the Berlin Wall. This strip and its redevelopment offer a window on the complex planning processes and issues that have been animating the city as a whole for the past fifteen years. In the main, plans developed since 1989 took a restorative approach, aimed at establishing continuity with the pre‐Wall character of sites and ground plans. More recently, however, a maverick view, which urged an ahistorical solution in the form of a greenbelt, merged with the desire to preserve the historical memory of the Wall. The result of this synthesis is a second layer of development that challenges the authority of the conventional planning process. The article sets analysis of post‐reunification planning documents within the context of post‐war planning experiences to gain insight into how planning in East and West Berlin contributed to recent developments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Planning Perspectives Taylor & Francis

Planning reunification: the planning history of the fall of the Berlin Wall

Planning Perspectives , Volume 21 (1): 21 – Jan 1, 2006
21 pages

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1466-4518
eISSN
0266-5433
DOI
10.1080/02665430500397329
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article looks at the history of plans for the reuse of the zone of land left vacant by the fall of the Berlin Wall. This strip and its redevelopment offer a window on the complex planning processes and issues that have been animating the city as a whole for the past fifteen years. In the main, plans developed since 1989 took a restorative approach, aimed at establishing continuity with the pre‐Wall character of sites and ground plans. More recently, however, a maverick view, which urged an ahistorical solution in the form of a greenbelt, merged with the desire to preserve the historical memory of the Wall. The result of this synthesis is a second layer of development that challenges the authority of the conventional planning process. The article sets analysis of post‐reunification planning documents within the context of post‐war planning experiences to gain insight into how planning in East and West Berlin contributed to recent developments.

Journal

Planning PerspectivesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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