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Play School, melancholia, and the politics of recognition

Play School, melancholia, and the politics of recognition This paper draws on Judith Butler’s notion of ‘gender melancholia’ as conceived in The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection, and Emmanuel Levinas’ notion of the face of the Other mobilized in Butler’s more recent work. In particular, I will focus on gender melancholia in order to consider why non‐heteronormative identities might cause such consternation when they appear in a specific pedagogical context. I also consider how the notion of gender melancholia may be useful in gaining a more in‐depth understanding of the prohibitions placed on the production and dissemination of texts that introduce young children to non‐normative representations of sexual and gender identity. In addition, the Levinasian notion of the face, as mobilized by Butler, prompts a consideration of the ethical implications of having certain faces that appear to be unrepresentable in particular pedagogical domains. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Sociology of Education Taylor & Francis

Play School, melancholia, and the politics of recognition

15 pages

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References (27)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1465-3346
eISSN
0142-5692
DOI
10.1080/01425690600803079
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper draws on Judith Butler’s notion of ‘gender melancholia’ as conceived in The Psychic Life of Power: Theories in Subjection, and Emmanuel Levinas’ notion of the face of the Other mobilized in Butler’s more recent work. In particular, I will focus on gender melancholia in order to consider why non‐heteronormative identities might cause such consternation when they appear in a specific pedagogical context. I also consider how the notion of gender melancholia may be useful in gaining a more in‐depth understanding of the prohibitions placed on the production and dissemination of texts that introduce young children to non‐normative representations of sexual and gender identity. In addition, the Levinasian notion of the face, as mobilized by Butler, prompts a consideration of the ethical implications of having certain faces that appear to be unrepresentable in particular pedagogical domains.

Journal

British Journal of Sociology of EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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