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Political Transition and Economic Reform. The Role of Labour in Zambian National Politics

Political Transition and Economic Reform. The Role of Labour in Zambian National Politics Summary Lise Rakner, ‘Political Transition and Economic Reform. The Role of Labour in Zambian National Politics’, Forum for Development Studies, No. 2, 1993, pp. 131–147. Zambia is currently attempting to restructure its economy along lines of market-integrated reforms. However, the economic restructuring is being pursued by a newly elected democratic government representing both labour, farming and business interests which is refuting existing theoretical knowledge and empirical evidence. This article examines Zambia's attempt to liberalise its economy and makes particular reference to the position of the Zambian trade union movement, President Chiluba's former base. Contrary to the policies pursued during the period of transition to democracy and in the first 18 months of multi-party rule, the trade union movement consistently argued against attempts to liberalise the economy in the period prior to 1990. The article addresses the questions of whether it will be possible for the new government to mobilise support among its urban constituents for the economic reforms, and, further, to what extent the current position of labour is sustainable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Forum for Development Studies Taylor & Francis

Political Transition and Economic Reform. The Role of Labour in Zambian National Politics

Forum for Development Studies , Volume 20 (2): 17 – Jan 1, 1993

Political Transition and Economic Reform. The Role of Labour in Zambian National Politics

Forum for Development Studies , Volume 20 (2): 17 – Jan 1, 1993

Abstract

Summary Lise Rakner, ‘Political Transition and Economic Reform. The Role of Labour in Zambian National Politics’, Forum for Development Studies, No. 2, 1993, pp. 131–147. Zambia is currently attempting to restructure its economy along lines of market-integrated reforms. However, the economic restructuring is being pursued by a newly elected democratic government representing both labour, farming and business interests which is refuting existing theoretical knowledge and empirical evidence. This article examines Zambia's attempt to liberalise its economy and makes particular reference to the position of the Zambian trade union movement, President Chiluba's former base. Contrary to the policies pursued during the period of transition to democracy and in the first 18 months of multi-party rule, the trade union movement consistently argued against attempts to liberalise the economy in the period prior to 1990. The article addresses the questions of whether it will be possible for the new government to mobilise support among its urban constituents for the economic reforms, and, further, to what extent the current position of labour is sustainable.

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References (24)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1891-1765
eISSN
0803-9410
DOI
10.1080/08039410.1993.9665946
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Lise Rakner, ‘Political Transition and Economic Reform. The Role of Labour in Zambian National Politics’, Forum for Development Studies, No. 2, 1993, pp. 131–147. Zambia is currently attempting to restructure its economy along lines of market-integrated reforms. However, the economic restructuring is being pursued by a newly elected democratic government representing both labour, farming and business interests which is refuting existing theoretical knowledge and empirical evidence. This article examines Zambia's attempt to liberalise its economy and makes particular reference to the position of the Zambian trade union movement, President Chiluba's former base. Contrary to the policies pursued during the period of transition to democracy and in the first 18 months of multi-party rule, the trade union movement consistently argued against attempts to liberalise the economy in the period prior to 1990. The article addresses the questions of whether it will be possible for the new government to mobilise support among its urban constituents for the economic reforms, and, further, to what extent the current position of labour is sustainable.

Journal

Forum for Development StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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