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Power and Danger: Feminist Engagement with International Law through the UN Security Council

Power and Danger: Feminist Engagement with International Law through the UN Security Council POWER AND DANGER: FEMINIST ENGAGEMENT WITH INTERNATIONAL LAW THROUGH THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL Dianne Otto 1.0 INTRODUCTION The claim that feminist ‘achievements’ are now so substantial and ‘sufficiently institutionalised’ as to wield significant power in international law has ignited debates among feminist academics and activists. Janet Halley, the chief proponent of this view, has coined the term ‘Governance Feminism’ to describe the way that feminists and feminist ideas have become ‘installed’ in legal- institutional power, most notably in the development of international criminal law aimed at prosecuting sexual violence. She criticises Governance Feminism for its failure to be critically 4 5 self-reflective, its reliance on state-centred forms of power, its promotion of the ‘sexual- subordination’ feminism of Catharine MacKinnon, and its persistent self-representation as the 7 8 ‘political underdog’. Her claim that feminism has ‘come to power’ is a spectacular divergence from the familiar accounts of feminist attempts to engage with international law and its institutions, which tell a saga of ‘marginalisation’, ‘silencing’, and ‘talking to ourselves’. The My title recalls Vance Carole S (ed) Pleasure and Danger: exploring female sexuality Routledge and Keagan Paul Books 1984. Although this ground-breaking collection is interested in exploring the tensions between pleasure http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Australian Feminist Law Journal Taylor & Francis

Power and Danger: Feminist Engagement with International Law through the UN Security Council

Australian Feminist Law Journal , Volume 32 (1): 25 – Jun 1, 2010
25 pages

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References (4)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© Australian Feminist Law Journal Inc. All rights reserved 2010
ISSN
2204-0064
eISSN
1320-0968
DOI
10.1080/13200968.2010.10854439
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

POWER AND DANGER: FEMINIST ENGAGEMENT WITH INTERNATIONAL LAW THROUGH THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL Dianne Otto 1.0 INTRODUCTION The claim that feminist ‘achievements’ are now so substantial and ‘sufficiently institutionalised’ as to wield significant power in international law has ignited debates among feminist academics and activists. Janet Halley, the chief proponent of this view, has coined the term ‘Governance Feminism’ to describe the way that feminists and feminist ideas have become ‘installed’ in legal- institutional power, most notably in the development of international criminal law aimed at prosecuting sexual violence. She criticises Governance Feminism for its failure to be critically 4 5 self-reflective, its reliance on state-centred forms of power, its promotion of the ‘sexual- subordination’ feminism of Catharine MacKinnon, and its persistent self-representation as the 7 8 ‘political underdog’. Her claim that feminism has ‘come to power’ is a spectacular divergence from the familiar accounts of feminist attempts to engage with international law and its institutions, which tell a saga of ‘marginalisation’, ‘silencing’, and ‘talking to ourselves’. The My title recalls Vance Carole S (ed) Pleasure and Danger: exploring female sexuality Routledge and Keagan Paul Books 1984. Although this ground-breaking collection is interested in exploring the tensions between pleasure

Journal

Australian Feminist Law JournalTaylor & Francis

Published: Jun 1, 2010

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