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Predictive Validity of Curriculum-Based Measures for English Learners at Varying English Proficiency Levels

Predictive Validity of Curriculum-Based Measures for English Learners at Varying English... This study examined the predictive validity of curriculum-based measures in reading for Spanish-speaking English learners (ELs) at various levels of English proficiency. Third-grade Spanish-speaking EL students were screened during the fall using DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency (DORF) and Daze. Predictive validity was examined in relation to spring reading outcomes on a statewide assessment. Overall, results revealed that DORF was a stronger predictor of reading outcomes than was Daze. Although Daze was a significant predictor when examined individually, it did not explain significant additional variance beyond DORF. There was not a significant difference in the predictive validity of DORF or Daze for students of varying English proficiency levels. However, the predictive accuracy of DORF and Daze cut-scores varied by English proficiency levels. The results suggest that schools may consider minimizing assessment time by only using DORF when screening. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Assessment Taylor & Francis

Predictive Validity of Curriculum-Based Measures for English Learners at Varying English Proficiency Levels

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References (59)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-6977
eISSN
1062-7197
DOI
10.1080/10627197.2015.1127750
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examined the predictive validity of curriculum-based measures in reading for Spanish-speaking English learners (ELs) at various levels of English proficiency. Third-grade Spanish-speaking EL students were screened during the fall using DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency (DORF) and Daze. Predictive validity was examined in relation to spring reading outcomes on a statewide assessment. Overall, results revealed that DORF was a stronger predictor of reading outcomes than was Daze. Although Daze was a significant predictor when examined individually, it did not explain significant additional variance beyond DORF. There was not a significant difference in the predictive validity of DORF or Daze for students of varying English proficiency levels. However, the predictive accuracy of DORF and Daze cut-scores varied by English proficiency levels. The results suggest that schools may consider minimizing assessment time by only using DORF when screening.

Journal

Educational AssessmentTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2016

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