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Public policies on water provision and early childhood education and care (ECEC): do they reduce and redistribute unpaid work?

Public policies on water provision and early childhood education and care (ECEC): do they reduce... Governments need to provide public finance to support services to reduce and redistribute unpaid work. However, while the financial costs of the required public investment are up front and highly visible; the (many) benefits are diffuse, spread over time, and include non-monetary as well as monetary benefits. This article focuses on two experiences from developing countries, in the water sector in Tanzania and early education and child care in Mexico and Chile. These experiences provide us with evidence of impact, enabling activists and policymakers to develop analysis to use in advocacy and policy formulation, including the modes of provision that are more likely to ensure equitable outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Gender and Development Taylor & Francis

Public policies on water provision and early childhood education and care (ECEC): do they reduce and redistribute unpaid work?

Gender and Development , Volume 22 (3): 16 – Sep 2, 2014
16 pages

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References (21)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© Oxfam GB 2014
ISSN
1364-9221
eISSN
1355-2074
DOI
10.1080/13552074.2014.963320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Governments need to provide public finance to support services to reduce and redistribute unpaid work. However, while the financial costs of the required public investment are up front and highly visible; the (many) benefits are diffuse, spread over time, and include non-monetary as well as monetary benefits. This article focuses on two experiences from developing countries, in the water sector in Tanzania and early education and child care in Mexico and Chile. These experiences provide us with evidence of impact, enabling activists and policymakers to develop analysis to use in advocacy and policy formulation, including the modes of provision that are more likely to ensure equitable outcomes.

Journal

Gender and DevelopmentTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 2, 2014

Keywords: unpaid work; gender equality; public policies; water; child care

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