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Putting knowledge in its place: science, colonialism, and the postcolonial

Putting knowledge in its place: science, colonialism, and the postcolonial Postcolonial Studies, Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 373388, 2009 Putting knowledge in its place: science, colonialism, and the postcolonial SUMAN SETH This special issue of Postcolonial Studies is divided into two parts. In the first, three leading scholars of postcolonial science studies*a philosopher, an anthropologist, and an historian (although each wears several hats)*have been asked to contribute short, programmatic essays on a theme of their choosing, focusing less on providing a ‘state of the field’ and more on directions for future research and analysis. In the second part, three historians have offered papers on topics of particular current interest: the history of cartography and colonialism; botany and empire; and the history of method outside Europe. In the essay below, I offer an overview of secondary scholarship on, in turn, colonialism and science, and postcolonial tech- noscience, before turning to a discussion of the articles making up the issue. The idea that science and technology were among the gifts that Western imperial powers brought to their colonies was an integral part of the discourse of the ‘civilizing mission,’ one vaunted by both proponents and critics of the methods of colonialism. ‘The political unity of India, more consolidated, and extending further http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Postcolonial Studies Taylor & Francis

Putting knowledge in its place: science, colonialism, and the postcolonial

Postcolonial Studies , Volume 12 (4): 16 – Dec 1, 2009
16 pages

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References (56)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright The Institute of Postcolonial Studies
ISSN
1466-1888
eISSN
1368-8790
DOI
10.1080/13688790903350633
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Postcolonial Studies, Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 373388, 2009 Putting knowledge in its place: science, colonialism, and the postcolonial SUMAN SETH This special issue of Postcolonial Studies is divided into two parts. In the first, three leading scholars of postcolonial science studies*a philosopher, an anthropologist, and an historian (although each wears several hats)*have been asked to contribute short, programmatic essays on a theme of their choosing, focusing less on providing a ‘state of the field’ and more on directions for future research and analysis. In the second part, three historians have offered papers on topics of particular current interest: the history of cartography and colonialism; botany and empire; and the history of method outside Europe. In the essay below, I offer an overview of secondary scholarship on, in turn, colonialism and science, and postcolonial tech- noscience, before turning to a discussion of the articles making up the issue. The idea that science and technology were among the gifts that Western imperial powers brought to their colonies was an integral part of the discourse of the ‘civilizing mission,’ one vaunted by both proponents and critics of the methods of colonialism. ‘The political unity of India, more consolidated, and extending further

Journal

Postcolonial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2009

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