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Rap, Recidivism and the Creative Self: A Popular Music Programme for Young Offenders in Detention

Rap, Recidivism and the Creative Self: A Popular Music Programme for Young Offenders in Detention Popular music is increasingly being viewed by local, state and national governments as a useful form of creative activity for at-risk youth both within and outside young offender institutions. This paper examines a music programme operating for a group of predominantly black youth within one North American detention centre, and considers the range of benefits observed in fostering individual creativity, self-esteem and social communication. Popular music programmes—in this case, rapping and basic music sequencing and composition—offer a highly practical and direct means of allowing youth offenders to express a particular form of creativity in connection with their existing music and cultural interests. This paper considers the relative success of one programme and the implications for drawing upon hip-hop music, with its themes of deviance and resistance, as a creative vehicle within a broader environment of ‘offender to citizen’ discourses for the youth involved. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Youth Studies Taylor & Francis

Rap, Recidivism and the Creative Self: A Popular Music Programme for Young Offenders in Detention

Journal of Youth Studies , Volume 10 (4): 18 – Sep 1, 2007
18 pages

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References (39)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1469-9680
eISSN
1367-6261
DOI
10.1080/13676260701262566
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Popular music is increasingly being viewed by local, state and national governments as a useful form of creative activity for at-risk youth both within and outside young offender institutions. This paper examines a music programme operating for a group of predominantly black youth within one North American detention centre, and considers the range of benefits observed in fostering individual creativity, self-esteem and social communication. Popular music programmes—in this case, rapping and basic music sequencing and composition—offer a highly practical and direct means of allowing youth offenders to express a particular form of creativity in connection with their existing music and cultural interests. This paper considers the relative success of one programme and the implications for drawing upon hip-hop music, with its themes of deviance and resistance, as a creative vehicle within a broader environment of ‘offender to citizen’ discourses for the youth involved.

Journal

Journal of Youth StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2007

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