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Regulating the unemployed: Australia's work‐for‐the‐dole scheme

Regulating the unemployed: Australia's work‐for‐the‐dole scheme Wearin g th e Pant s Regulating the Unemployed: Australia's Work-for-the-Dole Scheme Judith Bessant In February 1997 the Australian Prime Minister John Howard announced a trial 'work-for-the-dole' plan for young people. Long-term unemployed young people from regional and rural areas were required to work as a condition for receipt of their unemployment allowance. Participants were to be paid at award rates, working for the number of hours equivalent to their dole payment. The scheme involved young unemployed people working on community-based projects (ie, tourism, community care/services, restoration of community facilities, sport, etc.). The initial aim was to have 10,000 young people working in the scheme at a cost of approximately $15 million. Subsequently the government extended the program, providing 25,000 places in 1998-99 in areas of high youth unemployment. From July 1998 all young people aged 18 to 24 years, classified as unemployed and in receipt of unemployment payments or the Common Youth Allowance for over 6 months, were required to undertake additional activity as well as look for work.1 By mid- 1999, as many commentators had confidently expected, the work-for-the-dole program was extended to include certain adults who had been unemployed for more than one year. The expansion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Australian Studies Taylor & Francis

Regulating the unemployed: Australia's work‐for‐the‐dole scheme

Journal of Australian Studies , Volume 24 (64): 10 – Jan 1, 2000
10 pages

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1835-6419
eISSN
1444-3058
DOI
10.1080/14443050009387557
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Wearin g th e Pant s Regulating the Unemployed: Australia's Work-for-the-Dole Scheme Judith Bessant In February 1997 the Australian Prime Minister John Howard announced a trial 'work-for-the-dole' plan for young people. Long-term unemployed young people from regional and rural areas were required to work as a condition for receipt of their unemployment allowance. Participants were to be paid at award rates, working for the number of hours equivalent to their dole payment. The scheme involved young unemployed people working on community-based projects (ie, tourism, community care/services, restoration of community facilities, sport, etc.). The initial aim was to have 10,000 young people working in the scheme at a cost of approximately $15 million. Subsequently the government extended the program, providing 25,000 places in 1998-99 in areas of high youth unemployment. From July 1998 all young people aged 18 to 24 years, classified as unemployed and in receipt of unemployment payments or the Common Youth Allowance for over 6 months, were required to undertake additional activity as well as look for work.1 By mid- 1999, as many commentators had confidently expected, the work-for-the-dole program was extended to include certain adults who had been unemployed for more than one year. The expansion

Journal

Journal of Australian StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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