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School science curriculum and innovation: An African perspective

School science curriculum and innovation: An African perspective EUR. J. sci. EDUC., 1984, VOL. 6, NO. 3, 217-225 School science curriculum and innovation: An African perspective Andrew O. Urevbu, University of Benin, Nigeria Introduction Why do w e stud y science in Africa? What are th e aims of science education in Africa and what guidelines for the construction of science curricula are available? At the sixth Leverhulme Inter-Universities conference on School Science Education in Africa held at th e University of Malawi in Marc h 1968, the following general response was offered (Lewis 1972): 1. To ensure that every person has such a grasp of science as to be ready to co-operate with understanding in the application of science to men's needs. 2. To ensure a sound foundation of th e basic principles and facts of science in those wh o seek to make their careers and serve society as scientists or technologists. 3. The ultimat e objectives of science education are t o develop scientific attitudes, acquire knowledge and understanding and master certain skills. These aims are likely to strike one as 'borrowed' and as not having enough 'Africa' in them. Indeed, they are similar to the goals accepted widely for science education in most http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Science Education Taylor & Francis

School science curriculum and innovation: An African perspective

European Journal of Science Education , Volume 6 (3): 9 – Jul 1, 1984

School science curriculum and innovation: An African perspective

European Journal of Science Education , Volume 6 (3): 9 – Jul 1, 1984

Abstract

EUR. J. sci. EDUC., 1984, VOL. 6, NO. 3, 217-225 School science curriculum and innovation: An African perspective Andrew O. Urevbu, University of Benin, Nigeria Introduction Why do w e stud y science in Africa? What are th e aims of science education in Africa and what guidelines for the construction of science curricula are available? At the sixth Leverhulme Inter-Universities conference on School Science Education in Africa held at th e University of Malawi in Marc h 1968, the following general response was offered (Lewis 1972): 1. To ensure that every person has such a grasp of science as to be ready to co-operate with understanding in the application of science to men's needs. 2. To ensure a sound foundation of th e basic principles and facts of science in those wh o seek to make their careers and serve society as scientists or technologists. 3. The ultimat e objectives of science education are t o develop scientific attitudes, acquire knowledge and understanding and master certain skills. These aims are likely to strike one as 'borrowed' and as not having enough 'Africa' in them. Indeed, they are similar to the goals accepted widely for science education in most

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References (8)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
0140-5284
DOI
10.1080/0140528840060303
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EUR. J. sci. EDUC., 1984, VOL. 6, NO. 3, 217-225 School science curriculum and innovation: An African perspective Andrew O. Urevbu, University of Benin, Nigeria Introduction Why do w e stud y science in Africa? What are th e aims of science education in Africa and what guidelines for the construction of science curricula are available? At the sixth Leverhulme Inter-Universities conference on School Science Education in Africa held at th e University of Malawi in Marc h 1968, the following general response was offered (Lewis 1972): 1. To ensure that every person has such a grasp of science as to be ready to co-operate with understanding in the application of science to men's needs. 2. To ensure a sound foundation of th e basic principles and facts of science in those wh o seek to make their careers and serve society as scientists or technologists. 3. The ultimat e objectives of science education are t o develop scientific attitudes, acquire knowledge and understanding and master certain skills. These aims are likely to strike one as 'borrowed' and as not having enough 'Africa' in them. Indeed, they are similar to the goals accepted widely for science education in most

Journal

European Journal of Science EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 1984

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