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Settler colonialism and the elimination of the native

Settler colonialism and the elimination of the native Journal of Genocide Research (2006), 8(4), December, 387 – 409 Settler colonialism and the elimination of the native PATRICK WOLFE The question of genocide is never far from discussions of settler colonialism. Land is life—or, at least, land is necessary for life. Thus contests for land can be— indeed, often are—contests for life. Yet this is not to say that settler colonialism is simply a form of genocide. In some settler-colonial sites (one thinks, for instance, of Fiji), native society was able to accommodate—though hardly unscathed—the invaders and the transformative socioeconomic system that they introduced. Even in sites of wholesale expropriation such as Australia or North America, settler colonialism’s genocidal outcomes have not manifested evenly across time or space. Native Title in Australia or Indian sovereignty in the US may have deleterious features, but these are hardly equivalent to the impact of frontier homicide. Moreover, there can be genocide in the absence of settler colo- nialism. The best known of all genocides was internal to Europe, while genocides that have been perpetrated in, for example, Armenia, Cambodia, Rwanda or (one fears) Darfur do not seem to be assignable to settler colonialism. In this article, I shall begin to explore, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Genocide Research Taylor & Francis

Settler colonialism and the elimination of the native

Journal of Genocide Research , Volume 8 (4): 23 – Dec 1, 2006
23 pages

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References (78)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Research Network in Genocide Studies
ISSN
1469-9494
eISSN
1462-3528
DOI
10.1080/14623520601056240
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Genocide Research (2006), 8(4), December, 387 – 409 Settler colonialism and the elimination of the native PATRICK WOLFE The question of genocide is never far from discussions of settler colonialism. Land is life—or, at least, land is necessary for life. Thus contests for land can be— indeed, often are—contests for life. Yet this is not to say that settler colonialism is simply a form of genocide. In some settler-colonial sites (one thinks, for instance, of Fiji), native society was able to accommodate—though hardly unscathed—the invaders and the transformative socioeconomic system that they introduced. Even in sites of wholesale expropriation such as Australia or North America, settler colonialism’s genocidal outcomes have not manifested evenly across time or space. Native Title in Australia or Indian sovereignty in the US may have deleterious features, but these are hardly equivalent to the impact of frontier homicide. Moreover, there can be genocide in the absence of settler colo- nialism. The best known of all genocides was internal to Europe, while genocides that have been perpetrated in, for example, Armenia, Cambodia, Rwanda or (one fears) Darfur do not seem to be assignable to settler colonialism. In this article, I shall begin to explore,

Journal

Journal of Genocide ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2006

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