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Settler common sense

Settler common sense Settler colonialism has been characterized as a structure, a system, and a logic. However, how do varied administrative projects of settlement and accompanying legal categories, geographies, and subjectivities become part of the everyday life of non-Natives? How do they come to shape settler self-understandings in ways that are not experienced as falsifiable philosophical propositions or as an integrated public policy program? Affective networks need to be explored as part of understanding how settler colonial governmentality comes to be lived as the self-evident conditions of possibility for (settler) being. This essay addresses that feeling of givenness and the kinds of social trajectories from which it emerges and which it engenders – a set of dynamics that can be described as settler common sense. Instead of suggesting that quotidian forms of settler sensation, self-hood, and possession follow axiomatically from policy formulations and official legal geography, it argues that the (shifting) parameters of settler governance help provide orientation, inclination, and momentum for non-Native experiences of the everyday. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Settler Colonial Studies Taylor & Francis

Settler common sense

Settler Colonial Studies , Volume 3 (3-4): 19 – Nov 1, 2013

Settler common sense

Settler Colonial Studies , Volume 3 (3-4): 19 – Nov 1, 2013

Abstract

Settler colonialism has been characterized as a structure, a system, and a logic. However, how do varied administrative projects of settlement and accompanying legal categories, geographies, and subjectivities become part of the everyday life of non-Natives? How do they come to shape settler self-understandings in ways that are not experienced as falsifiable philosophical propositions or as an integrated public policy program? Affective networks need to be explored as part of understanding how settler colonial governmentality comes to be lived as the self-evident conditions of possibility for (settler) being. This essay addresses that feeling of givenness and the kinds of social trajectories from which it emerges and which it engenders – a set of dynamics that can be described as settler common sense. Instead of suggesting that quotidian forms of settler sensation, self-hood, and possession follow axiomatically from policy formulations and official legal geography, it argues that the (shifting) parameters of settler governance help provide orientation, inclination, and momentum for non-Native experiences of the everyday.

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2013 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1838-0743
eISSN
2201-473X
DOI
10.1080/2201473X.2013.810702
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Settler colonialism has been characterized as a structure, a system, and a logic. However, how do varied administrative projects of settlement and accompanying legal categories, geographies, and subjectivities become part of the everyday life of non-Natives? How do they come to shape settler self-understandings in ways that are not experienced as falsifiable philosophical propositions or as an integrated public policy program? Affective networks need to be explored as part of understanding how settler colonial governmentality comes to be lived as the self-evident conditions of possibility for (settler) being. This essay addresses that feeling of givenness and the kinds of social trajectories from which it emerges and which it engenders – a set of dynamics that can be described as settler common sense. Instead of suggesting that quotidian forms of settler sensation, self-hood, and possession follow axiomatically from policy formulations and official legal geography, it argues that the (shifting) parameters of settler governance help provide orientation, inclination, and momentum for non-Native experiences of the everyday.

Journal

Settler Colonial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Nov 1, 2013

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