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Sexual citizens: a landmark study of sex, power, and assault on campus

Sexual citizens: a landmark study of sex, power, and assault on campus ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES 2491 which serves to highlight how fat cells are differently valued according to the body in which they are located. Chapter 4 explores the affirmation to secure in relation to attempts to “ward against aging in light of biopolitical and disciplinary efforts to maximize ‘third age’” (97–98). In this context the authors emphasize the dual-edged nature of strategies which seek to extend and enhance life on the one hand, whilst separ- ating out degenerating bodies on the other. The main aim of this dual strategy, the authors show, is to secure against the costs of dependent ageing populations. The final substantive chapter, focuses on the afterlife of the dead human body. The chapter examines the ways in which environmental sustainability concerns have seeped into contemporary body disposal techniques and memorialization and commemoration practices. Such activities (such as recycling body parts) aim to “green” (136) the dead human body. These practices, the authors argue, seek to extend discourses around biomedical truths and confirm life by affirming the afterlife. The book ends with what it refers to as its “coda”, which seeks to consider the ways in which we might reframe the “intimate governing operations of affirmation” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnic and Racial Studies Taylor & Francis

Sexual citizens: a landmark study of sex, power, and assault on campus

Ethnic and Racial Studies , Volume 44 (13): 4 – Oct 21, 2021

Sexual citizens: a landmark study of sex, power, and assault on campus

Ethnic and Racial Studies , Volume 44 (13): 4 – Oct 21, 2021

Abstract

ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES 2491 which serves to highlight how fat cells are differently valued according to the body in which they are located. Chapter 4 explores the affirmation to secure in relation to attempts to “ward against aging in light of biopolitical and disciplinary efforts to maximize ‘third age’” (97–98). In this context the authors emphasize the dual-edged nature of strategies which seek to extend and enhance life on the one hand, whilst separ- ating out degenerating bodies on the other. The main aim of this dual strategy, the authors show, is to secure against the costs of dependent ageing populations. The final substantive chapter, focuses on the afterlife of the dead human body. The chapter examines the ways in which environmental sustainability concerns have seeped into contemporary body disposal techniques and memorialization and commemoration practices. Such activities (such as recycling body parts) aim to “green” (136) the dead human body. These practices, the authors argue, seek to extend discourses around biomedical truths and confirm life by affirming the afterlife. The book ends with what it refers to as its “coda”, which seeks to consider the ways in which we might reframe the “intimate governing operations of affirmation”

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Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2020 Sara Salem
ISSN
1466-4356
eISSN
0141-9870
DOI
10.1080/01419870.2020.1867760
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ETHNIC AND RACIAL STUDIES 2491 which serves to highlight how fat cells are differently valued according to the body in which they are located. Chapter 4 explores the affirmation to secure in relation to attempts to “ward against aging in light of biopolitical and disciplinary efforts to maximize ‘third age’” (97–98). In this context the authors emphasize the dual-edged nature of strategies which seek to extend and enhance life on the one hand, whilst separ- ating out degenerating bodies on the other. The main aim of this dual strategy, the authors show, is to secure against the costs of dependent ageing populations. The final substantive chapter, focuses on the afterlife of the dead human body. The chapter examines the ways in which environmental sustainability concerns have seeped into contemporary body disposal techniques and memorialization and commemoration practices. Such activities (such as recycling body parts) aim to “green” (136) the dead human body. These practices, the authors argue, seek to extend discourses around biomedical truths and confirm life by affirming the afterlife. The book ends with what it refers to as its “coda”, which seeks to consider the ways in which we might reframe the “intimate governing operations of affirmation”

Journal

Ethnic and Racial StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 21, 2021

There are no references for this article.