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Space to grow: Copyright, cultural policy and commercially‐focused music in China

Space to grow: Copyright, cultural policy and commercially‐focused music in China A difficult copyright environment, combined with the Chinese government's continuing power over key distribution and promotion channels, including radio, television, publishing and concerts (Baranovitch, 2003; Brady, 2006), have been key factors in the failure of international labels to secure a dominant position in China's rapidly developing domestic music market. This paper argues that while international record labels have been paralyzed by concepts of value that depend on an ability to control the copying of music products and to enforce intellectual property rights (Montgomery & Potts, 2008), domestic music and entertainment businesses are actively exploring strategies that allow them to function in a weak copyright environment. Cultural policies ostensibly intended to prevent the circulation of heterodox content are having an important side‐effect: making it more attractive for music‐related businesses to promote and distribute local content. As a result, domestic music and entertainment businesses are developing a distinct advantage in the highly competitive Chinese market. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Chinese Journal of Communication Taylor & Francis

Space to grow: Copyright, cultural policy and commercially‐focused music in China

Chinese Journal of Communication , Volume 2 (1): 14 – Mar 1, 2009
14 pages

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References (49)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright The Communication Research Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
ISSN
1754-4769
eISSN
1754-4750
DOI
10.1080/17544750802639044
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A difficult copyright environment, combined with the Chinese government's continuing power over key distribution and promotion channels, including radio, television, publishing and concerts (Baranovitch, 2003; Brady, 2006), have been key factors in the failure of international labels to secure a dominant position in China's rapidly developing domestic music market. This paper argues that while international record labels have been paralyzed by concepts of value that depend on an ability to control the copying of music products and to enforce intellectual property rights (Montgomery & Potts, 2008), domestic music and entertainment businesses are actively exploring strategies that allow them to function in a weak copyright environment. Cultural policies ostensibly intended to prevent the circulation of heterodox content are having an important side‐effect: making it more attractive for music‐related businesses to promote and distribute local content. As a result, domestic music and entertainment businesses are developing a distinct advantage in the highly competitive Chinese market.

Journal

Chinese Journal of CommunicationTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2009

Keywords: music; copyright; cultural policy; mobile phones; digital distribution; protectionism

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