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Speaking back to educational policy: why social inclusion will not work for disadvantaged Australian schools

Speaking back to educational policy: why social inclusion will not work for disadvantaged... The Labor government in Australia has recently embarked on an extremely ambitious program of social inclusion for the most marginalized groups in society. Drawing upon the approach of policy scholarship this paper examines some federal government ‘policy texts’ to describe what has occurred and asks questions about what is meant by the social inclusion policy orientation in the context of educational disadvantage. It challenges the efficacy of uncritically following the experience of New Labour in England as the basis for an Australian social inclusion agenda. The paper concludes with the need to include the voices of ‘policy users’, who are supposed to be the beneficiaries, in the construction of more reflexive alternatives. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Critical Studies in Education Taylor & Francis

Speaking back to educational policy: why social inclusion will not work for disadvantaged Australian schools

Critical Studies in Education , Volume 51 (2): 16 – May 7, 2010
16 pages

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References (25)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1750-8495
eISSN
1750-8487
DOI
10.1080/17508481003742320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Labor government in Australia has recently embarked on an extremely ambitious program of social inclusion for the most marginalized groups in society. Drawing upon the approach of policy scholarship this paper examines some federal government ‘policy texts’ to describe what has occurred and asks questions about what is meant by the social inclusion policy orientation in the context of educational disadvantage. It challenges the efficacy of uncritically following the experience of New Labour in England as the basis for an Australian social inclusion agenda. The paper concludes with the need to include the voices of ‘policy users’, who are supposed to be the beneficiaries, in the construction of more reflexive alternatives.

Journal

Critical Studies in EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: May 7, 2010

Keywords: critical policy analysis; educational disadvantage; social inclusion

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