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Sport and Olympism: Universals and Multiculturalism

Sport and Olympism: Universals and Multiculturalism Journal of the Philosophy of Sport, 2006, 33, 188-204 © 2006 International Association for the Philosophy of Sport Sport and Olympism: Universals and Multiculturalism Jim Parry We live in a world of universalizing tendencies, where the economic and politi- cal forces of globalization meet the ethical and cultural imperatives generated by our need to coexist in a shrinking and increasingly interconnected global society. Sport is not immune to these tendencies. Rather, in the experience of many mil- lions of people, it is a prominent example of them, graphically illustrating them in the processes of global dissemination and participation, commercialization, sponsorship, athlete migration, equipment production and distribution, media/sport symbiosis, politics/sport relations, and increasing rules clarifi cation together with their progressively universal interpretation and application. Through our participation in, or consumption of, sport, such widespread tendencies and processes are rendered visible and potentially intelligible. Critics have often noted the conservative effect of sports in their “naturalizing” of human capacities and relations (“of course men and women are not equal—look at tennis or athletics”), but I suggest that this effect need not be conservative. It is also possible for radical restatements of capacities and reconceptualizations of human relations to be naturalized through http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Philosophy of Sport Taylor & Francis

Sport and Olympism: Universals and Multiculturalism

Journal of the Philosophy of Sport , Volume 33 (2): 17 – Oct 1, 2006
17 pages

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1543-2939
eISSN
0094-8705
DOI
10.1080/00948705.2006.9714701
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of the Philosophy of Sport, 2006, 33, 188-204 © 2006 International Association for the Philosophy of Sport Sport and Olympism: Universals and Multiculturalism Jim Parry We live in a world of universalizing tendencies, where the economic and politi- cal forces of globalization meet the ethical and cultural imperatives generated by our need to coexist in a shrinking and increasingly interconnected global society. Sport is not immune to these tendencies. Rather, in the experience of many mil- lions of people, it is a prominent example of them, graphically illustrating them in the processes of global dissemination and participation, commercialization, sponsorship, athlete migration, equipment production and distribution, media/sport symbiosis, politics/sport relations, and increasing rules clarifi cation together with their progressively universal interpretation and application. Through our participation in, or consumption of, sport, such widespread tendencies and processes are rendered visible and potentially intelligible. Critics have often noted the conservative effect of sports in their “naturalizing” of human capacities and relations (“of course men and women are not equal—look at tennis or athletics”), but I suggest that this effect need not be conservative. It is also possible for radical restatements of capacities and reconceptualizations of human relations to be naturalized through

Journal

Journal of the Philosophy of SportTaylor & Francis

Published: Oct 1, 2006

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