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Teaching (with) Disability: Pedagogies of Lived Experience

Teaching (with) Disability: Pedagogies of Lived Experience The Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, 28:367–379, 2006 Copyright # Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1071-4413 print=1556-3022 online DOI: 10.1080/10714410600873258 Teaching (with) Disability: Pedagogies of Lived Experience Robert C. Anderson ‘‘IF A FISH WERE AN ANTHROPOLOGIST, THE LAST THING IT WOULD DISCOVER WOULD BE WATER.’’ This saying, widely attributed to Margaret Mead, illuminates the irony of cultural conditioning. In teaching about dis- ability, the first step means becoming aware of one’s own body— and the bodies of others in the room. The body is everywhere in social life, texts, and public discourse. We just have trouble seeing it, because we are so immersed in our own skin. Serious consideration of disability in the major social theories is a relatively new development. Feminism, critical race, and queer stu- dies have rigorously grappled with issues of embodiment and social justice. These perspectives greatly enhance pedagogy and learning. However, the embodied experience of disability has not been a traditional topic for pedagogy and praxis. People with dis- abilities still fight for a place at the table in academe. The disability perspective promises new insights for critical pedagogy. Disability is not just another specialty with concerns loosely related to other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies" Taylor & Francis

Teaching (with) Disability: Pedagogies of Lived Experience

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1556-3022
eISSN
1071-4413
DOI
10.1080/10714410600873258
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, 28:367–379, 2006 Copyright # Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1071-4413 print=1556-3022 online DOI: 10.1080/10714410600873258 Teaching (with) Disability: Pedagogies of Lived Experience Robert C. Anderson ‘‘IF A FISH WERE AN ANTHROPOLOGIST, THE LAST THING IT WOULD DISCOVER WOULD BE WATER.’’ This saying, widely attributed to Margaret Mead, illuminates the irony of cultural conditioning. In teaching about dis- ability, the first step means becoming aware of one’s own body— and the bodies of others in the room. The body is everywhere in social life, texts, and public discourse. We just have trouble seeing it, because we are so immersed in our own skin. Serious consideration of disability in the major social theories is a relatively new development. Feminism, critical race, and queer stu- dies have rigorously grappled with issues of embodiment and social justice. These perspectives greatly enhance pedagogy and learning. However, the embodied experience of disability has not been a traditional topic for pedagogy and praxis. People with dis- abilities still fight for a place at the table in academe. The disability perspective promises new insights for critical pedagogy. Disability is not just another specialty with concerns loosely related to other

Journal

"Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies"Taylor & Francis

Published: Dec 1, 2006

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