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The 12th-Century Bishop's Palace at Hereford

The 12th-Century Bishop's Palace at Hereford THE CELEBRATED TIMBER aisled hall of the Bishop's Palace, Hereford, is reassessed in the light of contemporary stone halls and of new evidence for its original plan. Bishop William de Vere (1186–98) is identified as the most likely builder. In contrast to a previous interpretation of the Palace as a traditional building reflecting ancient forms, it is assigned to a group of sumptuous late 12th-century halls, products of a new fashion. Recently-discovered plans of c. 1840, in conjunction with other evidence, make possible a reconstruction of the complete original plan: a four-bay hall, a side porch, and an end chamber-block of three floors over a basement. A building demolished in the late 18th century is interpreted as a detached main chamber-block. The Palace complex was separated from the cathedral by a stone wall; its main front faced west to what may then have been the main N.-S. route through Hereford. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Medieval Archaeology Taylor & Francis

The 12th-Century Bishop's Palace at Hereford

Medieval Archaeology , Volume 31 (1): 14 – Jan 1, 1987

The 12th-Century Bishop's Palace at Hereford

Medieval Archaeology , Volume 31 (1): 14 – Jan 1, 1987

Abstract

THE CELEBRATED TIMBER aisled hall of the Bishop's Palace, Hereford, is reassessed in the light of contemporary stone halls and of new evidence for its original plan. Bishop William de Vere (1186–98) is identified as the most likely builder. In contrast to a previous interpretation of the Palace as a traditional building reflecting ancient forms, it is assigned to a group of sumptuous late 12th-century halls, products of a new fashion. Recently-discovered plans of c. 1840, in conjunction with other evidence, make possible a reconstruction of the complete original plan: a four-bay hall, a side porch, and an end chamber-block of three floors over a basement. A building demolished in the late 18th century is interpreted as a detached main chamber-block. The Palace complex was separated from the cathedral by a stone wall; its main front faced west to what may then have been the main N.-S. route through Hereford.

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References (20)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 1987 Society for Medieval Archaeology
ISSN
1745-817X
eISSN
0076-6097
DOI
10.1080/00766097.1987.11735493
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE CELEBRATED TIMBER aisled hall of the Bishop's Palace, Hereford, is reassessed in the light of contemporary stone halls and of new evidence for its original plan. Bishop William de Vere (1186–98) is identified as the most likely builder. In contrast to a previous interpretation of the Palace as a traditional building reflecting ancient forms, it is assigned to a group of sumptuous late 12th-century halls, products of a new fashion. Recently-discovered plans of c. 1840, in conjunction with other evidence, make possible a reconstruction of the complete original plan: a four-bay hall, a side porch, and an end chamber-block of three floors over a basement. A building demolished in the late 18th century is interpreted as a detached main chamber-block. The Palace complex was separated from the cathedral by a stone wall; its main front faced west to what may then have been the main N.-S. route through Hereford.

Journal

Medieval ArchaeologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1987

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