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The black death in county Durham

The black death in county Durham The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it attempts to estimate the number of deaths in percentage terms which County Durham may have experienced in 1349 during the first outbreak of the plague and to compare this with what happened in other parts of England. Following this is a consideration of the length of time over which the plague continued to have an adverse effect on the level of population and when a recovery began. All the evidence relates to properties belonging to the cathedral priory of Durham and is largely of an economic nature and therefore indirect and circumstantial. The exceptions are five short parchment rolls on which the monks recorded the names of their tenants who died in 1349, and it is the existence of this direct evidence that has made this study of special interest. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medieval History Taylor & Francis

The black death in county Durham

Journal of Medieval History , Volume 15 (2): 14 – Jan 1, 1989

The black death in county Durham

Journal of Medieval History , Volume 15 (2): 14 – Jan 1, 1989

Abstract

The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it attempts to estimate the number of deaths in percentage terms which County Durham may have experienced in 1349 during the first outbreak of the plague and to compare this with what happened in other parts of England. Following this is a consideration of the length of time over which the plague continued to have an adverse effect on the level of population and when a recovery began. All the evidence relates to properties belonging to the cathedral priory of Durham and is largely of an economic nature and therefore indirect and circumstantial. The exceptions are five short parchment rolls on which the monks recorded the names of their tenants who died in 1349, and it is the existence of this direct evidence that has made this study of special interest.

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References (12)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1873-1279
eISSN
0304-4181
DOI
10.1016/0304-4181(89)90013-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this article is twofold. First, it attempts to estimate the number of deaths in percentage terms which County Durham may have experienced in 1349 during the first outbreak of the plague and to compare this with what happened in other parts of England. Following this is a consideration of the length of time over which the plague continued to have an adverse effect on the level of population and when a recovery began. All the evidence relates to properties belonging to the cathedral priory of Durham and is largely of an economic nature and therefore indirect and circumstantial. The exceptions are five short parchment rolls on which the monks recorded the names of their tenants who died in 1349, and it is the existence of this direct evidence that has made this study of special interest.

Journal

Journal of Medieval HistoryTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1989

There are no references for this article.