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The Comeback of the European Cities

The Comeback of the European Cities International Review of Sociology* Revue Internationale de Sociologie Vol. 16, No. 2, July 2006, pp. 471 485 Karl Schlo ¨ gel Introduction The changes in the former Eastern Bloc societies are embodied most concisely in the cities. They are the stage, the experimental field, the laboratory of a process, in which living conditions are being completely revolutionized. The changes are clearly embodied in the cities’ looks, but also in less visible structural changes. How to judge these changes is a matter for debate among most observers. What one group sees as the rebirth of the idea of the polis after decades of bureaucratic dominance by Soviet- style socialism, is for another group a repetition of all the typical characteristics of capitalism. So, as one side laments the transformation of Prague, one of the oldest, most distinctive metropolises of Central Europe, into a Disneyworld of global tourism, the other side celebrates the disappearance of the grey city of neglect that Prague once was. The analysis in this paper, I should say in advance, does appreciate the negative characteristics, such as the rapid increase of private transportation and cars, land speculation, and urban sprawl, but the overall view is different, it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Review of Sociology Taylor & Francis

The Comeback of the European Cities

International Review of Sociology , Volume 16 (2): 15 – Jul 1, 2006
15 pages

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References (28)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’
ISSN
1469-9273
eISSN
0390-6701
DOI
10.1080/03906700600709442
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International Review of Sociology* Revue Internationale de Sociologie Vol. 16, No. 2, July 2006, pp. 471 485 Karl Schlo ¨ gel Introduction The changes in the former Eastern Bloc societies are embodied most concisely in the cities. They are the stage, the experimental field, the laboratory of a process, in which living conditions are being completely revolutionized. The changes are clearly embodied in the cities’ looks, but also in less visible structural changes. How to judge these changes is a matter for debate among most observers. What one group sees as the rebirth of the idea of the polis after decades of bureaucratic dominance by Soviet- style socialism, is for another group a repetition of all the typical characteristics of capitalism. So, as one side laments the transformation of Prague, one of the oldest, most distinctive metropolises of Central Europe, into a Disneyworld of global tourism, the other side celebrates the disappearance of the grey city of neglect that Prague once was. The analysis in this paper, I should say in advance, does appreciate the negative characteristics, such as the rapid increase of private transportation and cars, land speculation, and urban sprawl, but the overall view is different, it

Journal

International Review of SociologyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 2006

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