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THE DEMISE OF GENTRIFICATION? A COMMENTARY AND PROSPECTIVE VIEW

THE DEMISE OF GENTRIFICATION? A COMMENTARY AND PROSPECTIVE VIEW COMMENTARY THE DEMISE OF GENTRIFICATION? A COMMENTARY AND PROSPECTIVE VIEW LS. Bourne University of Toronto Toronto M5S 1A1, Ontario Canada Gentrification has been a major theme in urban studies, planning, and geography for more than two decades. Indeed, it may appear to some observers that this single subject has dominated academic debate, as well as the scholarly publication record, in research on urban residential change. That literature is now voluminous, diverse, and often contradictory (Smith and Herod, 1992).1 As a consequence, many students of the city now view the gentrification phenomenon as one of the most pervasive processes of social change operating to restructure the contemporary inner city. In the more extreme cases gentrification is seen as leading to a reversal of the traditional social status gradient in cities, ultimately resulting in an elite inner city, in effect an entire landscape recaptured by the new professional class (Bourne, 1989). The argument of this commentary is that these kinds of generalizations, and the images and inferences that flow from them, are overdrawn and potentially misleading. Specifically, the paper attempts to encourage debate by demonstrating that the extent and impact of gentrification have been much more limited than this literature implies, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban Geography Taylor & Francis

THE DEMISE OF GENTRIFICATION? A COMMENTARY AND PROSPECTIVE VIEW

Urban Geography , Volume 14 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 1993

THE DEMISE OF GENTRIFICATION? A COMMENTARY AND PROSPECTIVE VIEW

Urban Geography , Volume 14 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 1993

Abstract

COMMENTARY THE DEMISE OF GENTRIFICATION? A COMMENTARY AND PROSPECTIVE VIEW LS. Bourne University of Toronto Toronto M5S 1A1, Ontario Canada Gentrification has been a major theme in urban studies, planning, and geography for more than two decades. Indeed, it may appear to some observers that this single subject has dominated academic debate, as well as the scholarly publication record, in research on urban residential change. That literature is now voluminous, diverse, and often contradictory (Smith and Herod, 1992).1 As a consequence, many students of the city now view the gentrification phenomenon as one of the most pervasive processes of social change operating to restructure the contemporary inner city. In the more extreme cases gentrification is seen as leading to a reversal of the traditional social status gradient in cities, ultimately resulting in an elite inner city, in effect an entire landscape recaptured by the new professional class (Bourne, 1989). The argument of this commentary is that these kinds of generalizations, and the images and inferences that flow from them, are overdrawn and potentially misleading. Specifically, the paper attempts to encourage debate by demonstrating that the extent and impact of gentrification have been much more limited than this literature implies,

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References (13)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1938-2847
eISSN
0272-3638
DOI
10.2747/0272-3638.14.1.95
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENTARY THE DEMISE OF GENTRIFICATION? A COMMENTARY AND PROSPECTIVE VIEW LS. Bourne University of Toronto Toronto M5S 1A1, Ontario Canada Gentrification has been a major theme in urban studies, planning, and geography for more than two decades. Indeed, it may appear to some observers that this single subject has dominated academic debate, as well as the scholarly publication record, in research on urban residential change. That literature is now voluminous, diverse, and often contradictory (Smith and Herod, 1992).1 As a consequence, many students of the city now view the gentrification phenomenon as one of the most pervasive processes of social change operating to restructure the contemporary inner city. In the more extreme cases gentrification is seen as leading to a reversal of the traditional social status gradient in cities, ultimately resulting in an elite inner city, in effect an entire landscape recaptured by the new professional class (Bourne, 1989). The argument of this commentary is that these kinds of generalizations, and the images and inferences that flow from them, are overdrawn and potentially misleading. Specifically, the paper attempts to encourage debate by demonstrating that the extent and impact of gentrification have been much more limited than this literature implies,

Journal

Urban GeographyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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