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The ecological context of knowledge: implications for learning science in developing countries

The ecological context of knowledge: implications for learning science in developing countries J. CURRICULUM STUDIES, 1988, VOL. 20, NO. 4 , 317-326 Th e ecological context of knowledge: implications for learning science in developing countries MARIANA G. A'B. HEWSON Introduction The focus of this paper is on knowledge, its growth and development, and the differences between knowledge in different groups, specifically the West and the developing countries. It is argued that rather than continuing to encourage the West to donate scientific knowledge and skills to developing countries, a different approach might usefully be taken. Critical dialogue between the West and the developing countries could promote conceptual change of the knowledge bases of both, and allow for the emergence of a new type of science that is effective in meeting specific problems at a range of levels in developing countries, and possibly in the West as well. Since a large part of the world is at this point still underdeveloped, there is a continuing urge for the developed nations to donate their expertise to alleviate some of the consequences of this. Modernization is considered good and necessary by both donors and recipients, and modernization is equated with Westernization, which, in turn, is seen as equivalent to science and technology. Roszak (1972) describes http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Curriculum Studies Taylor & Francis

The ecological context of knowledge: implications for learning science in developing countries

Journal of Curriculum Studies , Volume 20 (4): 10 – Jul 1, 1988

The ecological context of knowledge: implications for learning science in developing countries

Journal of Curriculum Studies , Volume 20 (4): 10 – Jul 1, 1988

Abstract

J. CURRICULUM STUDIES, 1988, VOL. 20, NO. 4 , 317-326 Th e ecological context of knowledge: implications for learning science in developing countries MARIANA G. A'B. HEWSON Introduction The focus of this paper is on knowledge, its growth and development, and the differences between knowledge in different groups, specifically the West and the developing countries. It is argued that rather than continuing to encourage the West to donate scientific knowledge and skills to developing countries, a different approach might usefully be taken. Critical dialogue between the West and the developing countries could promote conceptual change of the knowledge bases of both, and allow for the emergence of a new type of science that is effective in meeting specific problems at a range of levels in developing countries, and possibly in the West as well. Since a large part of the world is at this point still underdeveloped, there is a continuing urge for the developed nations to donate their expertise to alleviate some of the consequences of this. Modernization is considered good and necessary by both donors and recipients, and modernization is equated with Westernization, which, in turn, is seen as equivalent to science and technology. Roszak (1972) describes

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References (21)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1366-5839
eISSN
0022-0272
DOI
10.1080/0022027880200402
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J. CURRICULUM STUDIES, 1988, VOL. 20, NO. 4 , 317-326 Th e ecological context of knowledge: implications for learning science in developing countries MARIANA G. A'B. HEWSON Introduction The focus of this paper is on knowledge, its growth and development, and the differences between knowledge in different groups, specifically the West and the developing countries. It is argued that rather than continuing to encourage the West to donate scientific knowledge and skills to developing countries, a different approach might usefully be taken. Critical dialogue between the West and the developing countries could promote conceptual change of the knowledge bases of both, and allow for the emergence of a new type of science that is effective in meeting specific problems at a range of levels in developing countries, and possibly in the West as well. Since a large part of the world is at this point still underdeveloped, there is a continuing urge for the developed nations to donate their expertise to alleviate some of the consequences of this. Modernization is considered good and necessary by both donors and recipients, and modernization is equated with Westernization, which, in turn, is seen as equivalent to science and technology. Roszak (1972) describes

Journal

Journal of Curriculum StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 1988

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