Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Emerging Dominance of Immigrants in the US Housing Market 1970–2000

The Emerging Dominance of Immigrants in the US Housing Market 1970–2000 The article summarizes growth trends in occupied housing in the USA and in five individual states with the largest immigrant populations—California, New York, Florida, Texas and Illinois. The analysis covers the decades between 1970 and 2000 and documents the explosive growth of immigrant housing demand. Foreign-born households constitute increasingly large shares of total households in the USA (11 percent in 2000), especially in renter-occupied housing (17 percent in 2000). In particular, immigrants constitute much of the growth in demand and are emerging as a dominant force in the US housing market. In the 1990s, they accounted for 32 percent of all household growth and 67 percent of all rental growth nationwide. In California and New York, immigrants accounted for 100 percent of all rental growth and over half of all growth in owner-occupied housing. The article also addresses the surprisingly steep upward trajectories into homeownership as immigrants settle longer in the USA. This upward mobility occurs equally in all the gateway states for immigrant settlement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urban Policy and Research Taylor & Francis

The Emerging Dominance of Immigrants in the US Housing Market 1970–2000

Urban Policy and Research , Volume 23 (3): 20 – Sep 1, 2005
19 pages

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/the-emerging-dominance-of-immigrants-in-the-us-housing-market-1970-SFcD6uufQ9

References (14)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1476-7244
eISSN
0811-1146
DOI
10.1080/08111470500197920
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The article summarizes growth trends in occupied housing in the USA and in five individual states with the largest immigrant populations—California, New York, Florida, Texas and Illinois. The analysis covers the decades between 1970 and 2000 and documents the explosive growth of immigrant housing demand. Foreign-born households constitute increasingly large shares of total households in the USA (11 percent in 2000), especially in renter-occupied housing (17 percent in 2000). In particular, immigrants constitute much of the growth in demand and are emerging as a dominant force in the US housing market. In the 1990s, they accounted for 32 percent of all household growth and 67 percent of all rental growth nationwide. In California and New York, immigrants accounted for 100 percent of all rental growth and over half of all growth in owner-occupied housing. The article also addresses the surprisingly steep upward trajectories into homeownership as immigrants settle longer in the USA. This upward mobility occurs equally in all the gateway states for immigrant settlement.

Journal

Urban Policy and ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Sep 1, 2005

Keywords: USA; immigrants; household growth; homeownership; upward mobility

There are no references for this article.