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the nature of criminality within one-percent motorcycle clubs

the nature of criminality within one-percent motorcycle clubs Most law enforcers and academic experts agree that the largest one-percent motorcycle clubs are a formof organized crime despite their origins as barroom brawlers. A few club goals related to the destruction of rival groups are more or less overtly criminal. Of greater concern to most observers is the manner in which these clubs provide a context for individuals with a high propensity for illegal activity to unite long enough to operate enterprises of varying levels of sophistication. Social isolation from the mainstream intensifies intra-group loyalties as it concentrates members' attention on the underworld. Bikers integrate their private and club lives in an manner that makes the distinction between club-sponsored and other activities problematic. The relationship of these enterprises to the club itself is often murky as is the line between their planned and spontaneous expressive crimes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Deviant Behavior Taylor & Francis

the nature of criminality within one-percent motorcycle clubs

Deviant Behavior , Volume 24 (3): 25 – May 1, 2003
25 pages

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References (66)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1521-0456
eISSN
0163-9625
DOI
10.1080/01639620390117291
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most law enforcers and academic experts agree that the largest one-percent motorcycle clubs are a formof organized crime despite their origins as barroom brawlers. A few club goals related to the destruction of rival groups are more or less overtly criminal. Of greater concern to most observers is the manner in which these clubs provide a context for individuals with a high propensity for illegal activity to unite long enough to operate enterprises of varying levels of sophistication. Social isolation from the mainstream intensifies intra-group loyalties as it concentrates members' attention on the underworld. Bikers integrate their private and club lives in an manner that makes the distinction between club-sponsored and other activities problematic. The relationship of these enterprises to the club itself is often murky as is the line between their planned and spontaneous expressive crimes.

Journal

Deviant BehaviorTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 2003

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