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The “Other Jeffersons” and the State University Idea

The “Other Jeffersons” and the State University Idea :f-E Eldon L. Johnson The "Other Jeffersons" and the State University Idea Intellectual roots of the state university run deep and created the first institu­ and far back. The men who had the ideas tions are little known and woefully neglected. Only a few professional historians could quickly recall anyone besides Thomas Jefferson; yet he was certainly not the beginning and had good company, both prede­ cessors and successors. That company helped shape the ideas and made the choice of institution that, as an alternative to the colonial college, was to lead to the guarantee of at least one public institution of higher education in every state (the Morrill Act of 1862). The essential ideas and even several institutions preceded Jefferson's innovations in Virginia. As early as 8 January 1790, President Washington made clear to Congress the options that had to be faced-whether the undergird­ ing of the new nation would be "best promoted by affording aids to seminaries of learning already established, by the institution of a na­ tional university, or by any other expedients" [20, p. 494]. The "other expedients" won out, not by Congressional action but by the continua­ tion of the state response already begun http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Higher Education Taylor & Francis

The “Other Jeffersons” and the State University Idea

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 58 (2): 24 – Mar 1, 1987

The “Other Jeffersons” and the State University Idea

The Journal of Higher Education , Volume 58 (2): 24 – Mar 1, 1987

Abstract

:f-E Eldon L. Johnson The "Other Jeffersons" and the State University Idea Intellectual roots of the state university run deep and created the first institu­ and far back. The men who had the ideas tions are little known and woefully neglected. Only a few professional historians could quickly recall anyone besides Thomas Jefferson; yet he was certainly not the beginning and had good company, both prede­ cessors and successors. That company helped shape the ideas and made the choice of institution that, as an alternative to the colonial college, was to lead to the guarantee of at least one public institution of higher education in every state (the Morrill Act of 1862). The essential ideas and even several institutions preceded Jefferson's innovations in Virginia. As early as 8 January 1790, President Washington made clear to Congress the options that had to be faced-whether the undergird­ ing of the new nation would be "best promoted by affording aids to seminaries of learning already established, by the institution of a na­ tional university, or by any other expedients" [20, p. 494]. The "other expedients" won out, not by Congressional action but by the continua­ tion of the state response already begun

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References (23)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright 1987 Ohio State University Press
ISSN
1538-4640
eISSN
0022-1546
DOI
10.1080/00221546.1987.11778237
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

:f-E Eldon L. Johnson The "Other Jeffersons" and the State University Idea Intellectual roots of the state university run deep and created the first institu­ and far back. The men who had the ideas tions are little known and woefully neglected. Only a few professional historians could quickly recall anyone besides Thomas Jefferson; yet he was certainly not the beginning and had good company, both prede­ cessors and successors. That company helped shape the ideas and made the choice of institution that, as an alternative to the colonial college, was to lead to the guarantee of at least one public institution of higher education in every state (the Morrill Act of 1862). The essential ideas and even several institutions preceded Jefferson's innovations in Virginia. As early as 8 January 1790, President Washington made clear to Congress the options that had to be faced-whether the undergird­ ing of the new nation would be "best promoted by affording aids to seminaries of learning already established, by the institution of a na­ tional university, or by any other expedients" [20, p. 494]. The "other expedients" won out, not by Congressional action but by the continua­ tion of the state response already begun

Journal

The Journal of Higher EducationTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 1987

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