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The reduction of the UK budget deficit: a human rights perspective

The reduction of the UK budget deficit: a human rights perspective This paper contributes to new thinking in economics by employing a human rights perspective to examine the budget deficit reduction strategy of the UK coalition government, as set out in 2010 in the June budget and October Spending Review. Focusing on economic and social rights, the paper explains the human rights obligations of governments and key human rights principles. As examples of how they should be applied to examine the deficit reduction strategy, it examines the implications of the policy changes for child poverty and gender equality, and finds that in both cases there is evidence to suggest non-compliance with the human rights obligations of the UK government. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Review of Applied Economics Taylor & Francis

The reduction of the UK budget deficit: a human rights perspective

International Review of Applied Economics , Volume 26 (2): 14 – Mar 1, 2012
14 pages

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References (33)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1465-3486
eISSN
0269-2171
DOI
10.1080/02692171.2011.640315
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper contributes to new thinking in economics by employing a human rights perspective to examine the budget deficit reduction strategy of the UK coalition government, as set out in 2010 in the June budget and October Spending Review. Focusing on economic and social rights, the paper explains the human rights obligations of governments and key human rights principles. As examples of how they should be applied to examine the deficit reduction strategy, it examines the implications of the policy changes for child poverty and gender equality, and finds that in both cases there is evidence to suggest non-compliance with the human rights obligations of the UK government.

Journal

International Review of Applied EconomicsTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2012

Keywords: budget deficits; expenditure cuts; human rights; economic and social rights; child poverty; gender equality; B59; E62

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