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The relation of entrapment, shame and guilt to depression, in carers of people with dementia

The relation of entrapment, shame and guilt to depression, in carers of people with dementia There is increasing research exploring depression in carers of people with dementia. This study explored the relation of entrapment, shame and guilt to depression in a group of 70 carers of those with dementia. As in other studies the experience of entrapment in the role was highly related to depression. Moreover, experiences of shame relating to self-criticism, other people's expectations and the fear of their criticism were significantly related to depression, entrapment and guilt. Guilt however, as focused on the fears of harming others, letting others down and sense of responsibility, was not associated with depression or entrapment. Depression in carers may relate in part to feeling trapped in a role but also being vulnerable to criticism and feelings of inadequacy in that role. In this study, degree of behavioural disturbance/dependence was not found to be significantly associated with any of the research variables. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aging & Mental Health Taylor & Francis

The relation of entrapment, shame and guilt to depression, in carers of people with dementia

Aging & Mental Health , Volume 10 (2): 6 – Mar 1, 2006
6 pages

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1364-6915
eISSN
1360-7863
DOI
10.1080/13607860500311953
pmid
16517484
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is increasing research exploring depression in carers of people with dementia. This study explored the relation of entrapment, shame and guilt to depression in a group of 70 carers of those with dementia. As in other studies the experience of entrapment in the role was highly related to depression. Moreover, experiences of shame relating to self-criticism, other people's expectations and the fear of their criticism were significantly related to depression, entrapment and guilt. Guilt however, as focused on the fears of harming others, letting others down and sense of responsibility, was not associated with depression or entrapment. Depression in carers may relate in part to feeling trapped in a role but also being vulnerable to criticism and feelings of inadequacy in that role. In this study, degree of behavioural disturbance/dependence was not found to be significantly associated with any of the research variables.

Journal

Aging & Mental HealthTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 1, 2006

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