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The social benefits of informal and lifestyle sports: a research agenda

The social benefits of informal and lifestyle sports: a research agenda INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORT POLICY AND POLITICS, 2017 VOL. 9, NO. 1, 1–10 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19406940.2017.1293132 EDITORIAL The social benefits of informal and lifestyle sports: a research agenda Understanding sport through the lens of social benefit has become a mainstay of sport policy analysis. A wealth of research has considered how sport contributes to achieving wider social benefits, including improvements to health and well-being, life satisfaction, crime reduction, community cohesion and activism, environmental stewardship, educational attainment, labour market participation, civic renewal, urban regeneration and developing youth (Coalter 2007, Oughton and Tacon 2007, Brookes and Wiggan 2009). Over the decades governments and policy- makers have advocated the use of traditional or mainstream sports for combating a range of social ‘problems’, from youth disengagement to poor health. Most recently, fears about rising levels of inactivity and obesity, particularly amongst children, are increasingly driving sports-based inter- ventions and the question of sport’s capacity to deliver public policy outcomes. Yet, as Coakley highlights, sport-related policies tend to be based on the unquestioned belief that sport participation is beneficial and an effective tool for individuals and society more broadly (Coakley 2011). But as critical research in the sport development field has illustrated, there is a general http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Sport Policy Taylor & Francis

The social benefits of informal and lifestyle sports: a research agenda

The social benefits of informal and lifestyle sports: a research agenda

International Journal of Sport Policy , Volume 9 (1): 10 – Jan 2, 2017

Abstract

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORT POLICY AND POLITICS, 2017 VOL. 9, NO. 1, 1–10 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19406940.2017.1293132 EDITORIAL The social benefits of informal and lifestyle sports: a research agenda Understanding sport through the lens of social benefit has become a mainstay of sport policy analysis. A wealth of research has considered how sport contributes to achieving wider social benefits, including improvements to health and well-being, life satisfaction, crime reduction, community cohesion and activism, environmental stewardship, educational attainment, labour market participation, civic renewal, urban regeneration and developing youth (Coalter 2007, Oughton and Tacon 2007, Brookes and Wiggan 2009). Over the decades governments and policy- makers have advocated the use of traditional or mainstream sports for combating a range of social ‘problems’, from youth disengagement to poor health. Most recently, fears about rising levels of inactivity and obesity, particularly amongst children, are increasingly driving sports-based inter- ventions and the question of sport’s capacity to deliver public policy outcomes. Yet, as Coakley highlights, sport-related policies tend to be based on the unquestioned belief that sport participation is beneficial and an effective tool for individuals and society more broadly (Coakley 2011). But as critical research in the sport development field has illustrated, there is a general

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References (76)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN
1940-6959
eISSN
1940-6940
DOI
10.1080/19406940.2017.1293132
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORT POLICY AND POLITICS, 2017 VOL. 9, NO. 1, 1–10 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19406940.2017.1293132 EDITORIAL The social benefits of informal and lifestyle sports: a research agenda Understanding sport through the lens of social benefit has become a mainstay of sport policy analysis. A wealth of research has considered how sport contributes to achieving wider social benefits, including improvements to health and well-being, life satisfaction, crime reduction, community cohesion and activism, environmental stewardship, educational attainment, labour market participation, civic renewal, urban regeneration and developing youth (Coalter 2007, Oughton and Tacon 2007, Brookes and Wiggan 2009). Over the decades governments and policy- makers have advocated the use of traditional or mainstream sports for combating a range of social ‘problems’, from youth disengagement to poor health. Most recently, fears about rising levels of inactivity and obesity, particularly amongst children, are increasingly driving sports-based inter- ventions and the question of sport’s capacity to deliver public policy outcomes. Yet, as Coakley highlights, sport-related policies tend to be based on the unquestioned belief that sport participation is beneficial and an effective tool for individuals and society more broadly (Coakley 2011). But as critical research in the sport development field has illustrated, there is a general

Journal

International Journal of Sport PolicyTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 2, 2017

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