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The social facting of education: Durkheim's legacy

The social facting of education: Durkheim's legacy J. CURRICULUM STUDIES, 1995, VOL. 27, NO. 4, 373-389 The social facting of education: Durkheim's legacy HERVÉ VARENNE Much has been made, over the past 20 years, of the inescapable grounding of all social scientific activity in ideological structures imposed on practitioners by, and revealed in, the very narrative and rhetorical tools at their disposal. Alternatively: Much has been made, over the past 20 years, of the fact that all researchers, because of their long participations in particular groups, develop particular narrative and rhetorical styles that reveal their ideological position. Both these statements attempt to capture something that all social science has to grapple with: when one looks at human action, one always recognizes it as in some way particular, rather than universal. Teaching is always teaching in a particular classroom in a particular school, it is never 'simply teaching'. Doing educational research is always doing it from within a particular tradition or culture. The two statements, however, are not identical in terms of their implicit theory of the relation between actor and tradition. The latter constructs an encultured actor with a specific identity; the former constructs an organized landscape of institutions for generalized actors. Both do this construction http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Curriculum Studies Taylor & Francis

The social facting of education: Durkheim's legacy

Journal of Curriculum Studies , Volume 27 (4): 17 – Jul 1, 1995

The social facting of education: Durkheim's legacy

Journal of Curriculum Studies , Volume 27 (4): 17 – Jul 1, 1995

Abstract

J. CURRICULUM STUDIES, 1995, VOL. 27, NO. 4, 373-389 The social facting of education: Durkheim's legacy HERVÉ VARENNE Much has been made, over the past 20 years, of the inescapable grounding of all social scientific activity in ideological structures imposed on practitioners by, and revealed in, the very narrative and rhetorical tools at their disposal. Alternatively: Much has been made, over the past 20 years, of the fact that all researchers, because of their long participations in particular groups, develop particular narrative and rhetorical styles that reveal their ideological position. Both these statements attempt to capture something that all social science has to grapple with: when one looks at human action, one always recognizes it as in some way particular, rather than universal. Teaching is always teaching in a particular classroom in a particular school, it is never 'simply teaching'. Doing educational research is always doing it from within a particular tradition or culture. The two statements, however, are not identical in terms of their implicit theory of the relation between actor and tradition. The latter constructs an encultured actor with a specific identity; the former constructs an organized landscape of institutions for generalized actors. Both do this construction

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References (6)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1366-5839
eISSN
0022-0272
DOI
10.1080/0022027950270403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

J. CURRICULUM STUDIES, 1995, VOL. 27, NO. 4, 373-389 The social facting of education: Durkheim's legacy HERVÉ VARENNE Much has been made, over the past 20 years, of the inescapable grounding of all social scientific activity in ideological structures imposed on practitioners by, and revealed in, the very narrative and rhetorical tools at their disposal. Alternatively: Much has been made, over the past 20 years, of the fact that all researchers, because of their long participations in particular groups, develop particular narrative and rhetorical styles that reveal their ideological position. Both these statements attempt to capture something that all social science has to grapple with: when one looks at human action, one always recognizes it as in some way particular, rather than universal. Teaching is always teaching in a particular classroom in a particular school, it is never 'simply teaching'. Doing educational research is always doing it from within a particular tradition or culture. The two statements, however, are not identical in terms of their implicit theory of the relation between actor and tradition. The latter constructs an encultured actor with a specific identity; the former constructs an organized landscape of institutions for generalized actors. Both do this construction

Journal

Journal of Curriculum StudiesTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 1995

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